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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Biological pesticides are included in integrated pest management systems

In Southeast Farm Press

Biological pesticides can play a key role in a successful integrated pest management program and can be useful in increasing sustainability on the farm.

Speaking at a symposium on the role biological crop protection products can play in sustainable agriculture in Orlando Oct. 11, David Epstein, senior entomologist with USDA’s Office of Pest Management Policy, said integrated pest management, or IPM, is all about ecosystems and a systems-based approach to controlling pests. Continue reading

Join the Northeastern IPM Center for its Third Annual IPM Online Conference on October 23, 2017

The third annual IPM Online Conference hosted by the Northeastern IPM Center (NEIPMC) will feature updates from active projects funded by the NEIPMC’s Partnership Grants Program. In addition, the online conference will have updates from IPM-related projects funded through the Northeastern Sustainable Agriculture and Education (NE SARE) Program and USDA-NIFA’s Applied Research and Development Program (ARDP) and Extension Implementation Program (EIP).

The rapid style conference will feature 5 minute presentations in which the speakers will discuss, show, or possibly sing! about 1 or 2 highlights from their projects. The purpose of the conference is to increase collaboration and awareness about current IPM-related research and extension in the Northeast in a fun way. Continue reading

IPM Leader receives Excellence in Extension Award

At their national meeting in August, the American Phytopathological Society recognized Center for Integrated Pest Management Director Frank Louws with the Excellence in Extension award for his outstanding Extension activities.

One of the primary examples of Dr. Louws’ Extension-based successes is his NC State University department, the Center for IPM. The Center has multiple cooperative agreements with USDA Animal Plant Health Investigative Service and grant funded projects with the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, including the Southern IPM Center. Many of these projects generate new information and translates the information to end-users including farmers, industry organizations and government agencies. Continue reading

Cooperative Extension professional hosts pesticide drop-off event

by Catherine Clabby, NC Health News

For most people in farming with a bulging to-do list, rain is a disruptor. Not for Walter Adams this week in Lenoir County, where he hosted a pesticide drop-off event.

Farmers and others were urged to bring unneeded pesticides, herbicides and fungicides to a spot in South Kinston. People expert at safely disposing of the chemicals took them off their hands for free, no questions asked. Continue reading

Efficient use of cover crops reduces pests and pesticides

In Corn and Soybean Digest

When transitioning to cover crops, go for encouraging diversity while adopting practices that protect beneficials, but do it with a plan in place, says entomologist Jonathan Lundgren.

  • Monitor cover crops and production crops alike for pests and beneficials.
  • Don’t overreact. Seeing a pest in the field doesn’t mean you have to kill it! In fact that may be a bad business decision.
  • Don’t ignore pests found either. Evaluate for economic thresholds, treat with pest specific products if possible and time application for maximum effectiveness in the pest cycle.
  • Consider interseeding cover crops with production crops, adds Lundgren, offering the pest an alternative food crop and boosting beneficials.
  • Understand pest cycles. Delayed planting may allow overwintering pests to complete their life cycle before emerging plants are at risk.

Cover crops are great for soil health, nutrient sequestration and moisture management. They can also be great havens for insects, as growers who’ve recently adopted cover crops can attest. Continue reading

IPM specialist receives national entomology honor

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

The Entomological Society of America recently named Reddy Palli of the University of Kentucky the 2017 recipient of the Nan-Yao Su Award for Innovation and Creativity in Entomology.

This award was created by an endowment from Nan-Yao Su to recognize creative entomologists who have found alternative solutions to problems that significantly impact entomology. Continue reading

EPA Releases Update to Popular School Integrated Pest Management Publication

On August 18, 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency released Pest Control in the School Environment: Implementing Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The publication is an update to its popular 1993 publication, Pest Control in the School Environment: Adopting Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The updated version reflects recent innovations in school IPM, provides links to new information, and has been redesigned into an easily printable format. It provides an overview of IPM and details the steps a school can follow to establish an IPM program.

As a smart, sensible, and sustainable approach to pest control, IPM reduces the need for routine pesticide use by utilizing sanitation, maintenance, monitoring, pest exclusion, habitat modification, human activity modification, and the judicious use of pesticides.   Continue reading