UGA workshop set for Aug. 23 will cover integrated pest management for schools

By Cristina deRevere for CAES News

Georgia has strict regulations and rules when it comes to managing pests at schools. The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) offers a biannual workshop on integrated pest management (IPM) for pest control operators who have school contracts in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. The program will host the fall 2018 School IPM Workshop on Thursday, Aug. 23.

Registration is open until Wednesday, Aug. 22 for the workshop that begins at 9 a.m. at the Student Learning Center on the UGA Griffin campus. The workshop ends at 3 p.m. Continue reading

Tick and Mosquito Conference, August 7, White Plains, NY

The New York State IPM Program, in collaboration with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Westchester County and Westchester County Parks, is hosting the 4th Annual IPM Conference. This year’s conference will explore the role of IPM in vector management, including insights from academics and practitioners. “Break the Cycle: Integrated Management of Ticks and Mosquitoes,” will take place on Tuesday, August 7th at the Westchester County Center in White Plains, NY. Continue reading

Northeast IPM Center announces recipients of 2018 Partnership Grants

To see this on the Northeast IPM Center website, go to:   http://neipmc.org/go/aBae

In 2018, the Northeastern IPM Center awarded more than $300,000 for research and outreach through its IPM Partnership Grants, a competitive funding program.

The Northeastern IPM Center began funding projects through the IPM Partnership Grants Program in 2004. Applications have come from public and private institutions or organizations, businesses, commodity groups, and private individuals. Continue reading

Scouting for insects is still important in a home vegetable garden

By Becky Griffin, University of Georgia

Whether you work on a large family farm, in a home vegetable garden, or in a small, community garden vegetable plot, routinely scouting for insects should be an important part of your vegetable-growing plan.

Insect pests can be a costly problem in vegetables. The life cycles of some insect pests are so short that missing just one week of scouting can lead to an increase in pests and damaged crops. Continue reading

Pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes joins the UGA Tifton campus

By Clint Thompson, Julie Jernigan, University of Georgia

New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes hopes to find more effective, sustainable solutions for Georgia farmers managing pest insects.

Since March 1, when she started her new position on the UGA Tifton campus, Acebes has identified the most pressing pest problems for pecan growers, including black and yellow pecan aphids, hickory shuckworms, pecan weevils and ambrosia beetles. Continue reading

UGA research aimed at stopping gummy stem blight in the greenhouse

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Georgia watermelon growers who have a targeted, informed disease management plan for gummy stem blight disease could save money and lessen the environmental impact of producing this favorite summertime fruit.

University of Georgia horticulturist Cecilia McGregor, along with fellow UGA scientists Marin Brewer and Bhabesh Dutta, studies the impact of reduced fungicide use through early detection of gummy stem blight in watermelons. Continue reading

Federal inspections report rodents, unsanitary worker practices behind egg recall

A report from the Food and Drug Administration reports rodents and unsanitary conditions at a North Carolina egg distributor linked to a major salmonella contamination. It’s a case where lack of integrated pest management had serious health consequences and created food safety issues.

Inspectors found “unacceptable rodent activity” and dirty equipment at the Rose Acre Farms egg operation in Pantego, N.C., during visits from March 26 to April 11, according to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration report. They also noted employees touching dirty floors, equipment and their bodies without washing their hands. Continue reading