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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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iPiPE Cooperative Agricultural Project RFA is open

The Integrated Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education (iPiPE) is now accepting applications for 4-year Crop-Pest Program statements of interest for their Cooperative Agricultural Projects. The iPiPE CAP, funded by a 2015 USDA AFRI 5-yr $7 million grant, provides such an infrastructure with cyberage tools, information products and expert commentary for detection and management of new, foreign, or emerging target pests and endemic pests that threaten U.S. crops. By categorizing pests, data, and users, it enables sharing pest observations while protecting privacy of individuals, companies, and government agencies. iPiPE Crop-Pest Programs (CPPs) incentivize growers and consultants to submit observations on target and endemic pests by providing tools and information for timely management decisions. Coordinated by extension professionals from across the nation, CPPs address a variety of crops and pests and provide undergraduate students with hands-on extension and diagnostic experiences. Risk-based research helps prioritize detection efforts for target pests and direct in-field scouting for endemic pests.

Observations housed in a national pest observation depository enable future research using geographically extensive, multi-year databases. The iPiPE CAP will fund 7 new CPPs in 2018.

Deadline: May 4, 2017, at 5:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time Continue reading

Marty Draper is appointed as head of KSU plant pathology department

Former USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture program leader Marty Draper is now the head of the plant pathology department at Kansas State University.

“I am excited to be getting back to the university setting, being able to work with producers, and trying to help the department become better than it already is,” Draper said in an interview with Grainnet. Continue reading

Southern rust confirmed in Virginia corn

In Southeast Farm Press

Southern rust was confirmed Aug. 3 on corn samples from Chesapeake and Suffolk in Virginia, according to a blog posting by Hillary Mehl, assistant professor of plant pathology at the Virginia Tech Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Suffolk.

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First sighting of soybean rust on U.S. crop made in Alabama

In Southeast Farm Press

The first U.S. sighting of soybean rust on soybeans for the current growing season was made this week in a sentinel plot in central Alabama’s Autauga County.

The disease was detected in a soybean sentinel plot in Prattville in Autauga County on Aug. 3. According to Ed Sikora, Auburn University Extension plant pathologist, the soybeans were at the R5 growth stage with 100 percent canopy closure. Incidence of soybean rust within the plot was less than 1 percent. The disease was previously reported on kudzu in Baldwin County, near the Alabama Gulf Coast.

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Plant pathologist keeps growers alerted to downy mildew risk

It wouldn’t be fall without pumpkins, and a University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment plant pathologist is part of an extension network that helps producers protect their pumpkins and other cucurbits from a potentially devastating disease.

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Soybean rust in full force this year in Alabama

From Southeast Farm Press

If you’ve ever thought about spraying a fungicide on soybeans, this would be the year to do it, says Ed Sikora, Auburn University Extension plant pathologist.

“All fields in Alabama, for the most part, have now been exposed to the soybean rust pathogen. We had a lot of soybeans planted late this year, and double-cropped beans were delayed due to wet conditions. These beans are at extreme risk. If you’ve ever thought about spraying a fungicide, this is the year to do it,” said Sikora at the recent East Alabama Crops Tour.

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New test determines viability of soybean rust spores

Spores from Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) pose a serious threat to soybean production in the United States because they can be blown great distances by the wind.

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