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Wondering what has been going on with your juniper and cypress trees?

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Juniper and cypress varieties hit hard by blight

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Super Juniper Eating Goat Project melds genetics, technology to manage plant pest

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

If Texans were to pick a plant that brings loathing and dread to city dwellers and ranchers alike, a range expert predicts the answer might well be juniper — or cedar, as it’s more commonly called.

“Allergy sufferers hate it, and ranchers dread its invasion of their pastures,” said Dr. Charles “Butch” Taylor, superintendent of the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Station at Sonora. “The two predominant species in Texas, redberry and blueberry juniper, even surpass mesquite as a rangeland nemesis since their range is much wider.” Continue reading