Graduate Research Assistantship in Stored Product Entomology | Entomological Society of America

One graduate research assistantship is available for a Ph.D. student in the Department of Entomology at Kansas State University. The research will focus on the development of behaviorally-based management strategies such as attract-and-kill and the use of long-lasting insecticide netting to prevent infestation by a range of stored product insects (e.g., red flour beetle, lesser grain borer, Indian meal moth) in mills, warehouses, and other facilities. This will include laboratory assays, semi-field experiments, and field trials.

The student will be co-advised by faculty from the USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health Research in Manhattan, KS. Successful candidates for this position should possess a M.S. in entomology, biology, or a related field. The student is expected to be supported for at least three years, which includes an annual stipend of $25,000, graduate student fringe benefits, and tuition and fees applied towards the Ph.D. program. The position will be available starting in January 2018, or until a qualified candidate has been identified. Interested individuals should send their curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and the contact information for three references to either Dr. Rob Morrison (william.morrison@ars.usda.gov) or Dr. Kun Yan Zhu (kzhu@ksu.edu) by September 30, 2017 or as soon as possible. However, complete applications must be submitted online at http://entomology.k-state.edu/for-students/admissions.html.

Two PhD student positions in Manhattan, Kansas

The United States Department of Agriculture and Kansas State University (Manhattan, KS) are looking for two PhD students to help run and grow the Invasive Mosquito Project (www.citizenscience.us). The Invasive Mosquito Project (IMP) is a partnered citizen science project that pairs schools with local professionals to teach about scientific research and recruit the next generation of STEM students while conducting mosquito surveillance and public health education. The project is summarized well by this ABC national news report (http://www.wcvb.com/politics/usda-launches-nationwide-project-to-track-invasive-mosquitoes/39871684). Continue reading

Marty Draper is appointed as head of KSU plant pathology department

Former USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture program leader Marty Draper is now the head of the plant pathology department at Kansas State University.

“I am excited to be getting back to the university setting, being able to work with producers, and trying to help the department become better than it already is,” Draper said in an interview with Grainnet. Continue reading

Stored Grain Integrated Pest Management in the North Central United States

Friday, September 12, 2014,
10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. CT

The webinar will include:

  • Biology and identification of key stored grain pests; basic of IPM for stored grain; proper fumigation—issues and challenges
    • Tom Phillips, Professor of Entomology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
  • Prevention of grain infestation: residual insecticides available and their proper application; strategic use of aeration for grain cooling and pest suppression
    • Frank Arthur, Research Entomologist, USDA ARS, Manhattan, KS
  • IPM for corn and other products in the upper Midwest: issues and challenges with grain drying and cooling; pest management for animal feed, ethanol and value-processed food
    • Linda Mason, Professor of Entomology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Webinar participants will see and hear presentations by the three teachers and then have an opportunity for live questions and answers. Instructional materials will be provided via internet links.

 Pre-registration is required. Go to http://www.ncipmc.org/training/ to register.  Participation will be limited to the first 200 computers. Hosting of viewing sites locally by Extension, government agencies, and private industry is encouraged.

This webinar will be archived for later viewing if you cannot attend this date and time.

Funding for this webinar is provided by USDA-NIFA through grants to the North Central Integrated Pest Management Center (2012-51120-20252 and 2011-51120-31160).

 

Scientists discover gene for wheat resistance to Ug99

From AgProfessional, 

Original press release from Kansas State University

The world’s food supply should be a little more plentiful thanks to a scientific breakthrough, according to excited university wheat researchers.

Eduard Akhunov, associate professor of plant pathology at Kansas State University, and his colleague, Jorge Dubcovsky from the University of California-Davis, led a research project that identified a gene that gives wheat plants resistance to one of the most deadly races of the wheat stem rust pathogen Ug99. This rust was first discovered in Uganda in 1999.

Continue reading