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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Natural enemy suppresses kudzu bug population

By Julie Jernigan, University of Georgia

A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.

The wasp, an egg parasitoid and natural enemy of the kudzu bug, is saving soybean farmers time and money. Continue reading

Tips for managing spring Insect pests

posted in the IPM Communicator by Ann Chambliss, Alabama Cooperative Extension Service

There are thousands of insects in residential ecosystems, most of which emerge in response to the weather, temperature in particular. Spring weather conditions can change considerably from year to year, so can the time to take action against a certain insect. For centuries, people have used plant phenology (blooms, leaf flush) as nature’s signs to set up wasp traps and mend window screens to fend off house flies. Phenology uses the correlation of recurring seasonal plant and insect life cycle stages, rather than calendar date, to predict the activity of pests.

Though the exact dates of emergence of the same species may vary from year to year, pest emergence around homes in Alabama occurs in a very similar order every year. The temperature-dependent biology of insects makes them better in tune with an ever changing climate, than the calendar. Continue reading

Integrated Pest Management Excellence will be recognized in 2018 at International IPM Conference

The best of the best in integrated pest management will receive awards and recognition at the 9th International IPM Symposium, March 19-22, 2018, in Baltimore, Maryland. Ten professional and 2 student winners were selected out of 27 professional and 9 student nominations. Four types of awards will be presented next year: Lifetime Achievement, IPM Practitioner, International IPM Awards for Excellence, International IPM Awards for Recognition and, new next year, Graduate Student awards.

Drs. Frank Zalom and Peter Goodell from the University of California will each receive the Lifetime Achievement award. Continue reading

Kudzu bugs’ decline is attributed to two factors

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Once a devastating presence in Georgia’s soybean fields and a major nuisance to homeowners, the kudzu bug population has diminished over the past three years.

“Having kudzu bugs in your field isn’t the end of the world. It becomes problematic when you have too many of them,” said Ian Knight, a University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences graduate student. Continue reading

Georgia researchers find soybeans resistant to kudzu bug

In Southeast Farm Press

by Merritt Melancon, Southeast Farm Press

Kudzu bugs are not native to Georgia, but in the past seven years, they’ve made their homes in soybean fields across the southeastern U.S.

While they don’t cause damage every soybean season, they can cause yield losses of between 20 and 60 percent. That can create a big loss for farmers who tend the approximately 80 million acres of soybeans grown in the U.S. each year. Continue reading

Kudzu-bug-resistant soybeans in development at the University of Georgia

By Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

Kudzu bugs are not native to Georgia, but in the past seven years, they’ve made their homes in soybean fields across the southeastern U.S.

While they don’t cause damage every soybean season, they can cause yield losses of between 20 and 60 percent. That can create a big loss for farmers who tend the approximately 80 million acres of soybeans grown in the U.S. each year. Fortunately a team of University of Georgia researchers may be on the verge of a solution. Continue reading

Kudzu bugs move toward Arkansas soybeans

In Delta Farm Press

by Ryan McGeeney, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture

After almost five years of waiting, the inevitable has finally arrived: Kudzu bugs have made their way across the Delta, into Arkansas, and are poised to begin affecting soybeans in the fall.

The pest, which overwinters in kudzu, was first detected in Arkansas in 2013, mostly in small numbers. Robert Goodson, Phillips County agricultural agent for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said that only within recent weeks had the pest been discovered in large numbers in a commercial soybean field near Helena, Ark. Continue reading