About mosquito and tick repellents

by Dawn H. Gouge1,2, Shujuan (Lucy) Li2, Shaku Nair2, Kathleen Walker1, Christopher S. Bibbs3

1Department of Entomology – College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, University of Arizona; 2Cooperative Extension – Arizona Pest Management Center, University of Arizona; 3Anastasia Mosquito Control District, FL

Introduction

Personal repellents (often referred to as “bug sprays“) are substances applied to skin, clothing, or other surfaces to repel or discourage insects and other arthropods such as ticks from feeding on humans. Repellents help people avoid bites from mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting arthropods that may transmit disease-causing pathogens, and allow them to engage freely in outdoor activities. Continue reading

It’s winter – Do I still have to worry about ticks?

Many people let down their guard for themselves and their pets once November comes because the associate the cold weather with fewer insects. However, when it comes to ticks, winter weather in the southern states often does not get cold enough to kill off the entire population of adult ticks. Therefore, it’s important to continue to protect pets and be vigilant during the winter months.

The National Pest Alert for ticks gives information about the most common tick species in the U.S., along with tick biology, disease symptoms and photographs of ticks in different stages. Colored maps also show where residents might find different tick species. Continue reading

Reducing your chances of getting bitten by ticks

Most people know about wearing insect repellent and long pants to prevent getting bitten by ticks, but there are also ways to reduce tick populations in your yards. For instance, making sure that loose leaves are kept to a minimum, treating heavily wooded areas with pesticides meant to kill ticks and mites, and treating some of the animal hosts for ticks are other ways to reduce tick numbers in your yard.

Read Entomology Today to see the detailed suggestions for how to protect yourself from ticks.

Part 2 of tick series: protecting the family

In Southwest Farm Press

by Leilana McKindra, Oklahoma State University

With spring in full bloom and summer well on the way, Oklahoma families heading outdoors to enjoy the warmer temperatures should take extra care to protect themselves against ticks.

Though ticks are active year-round throughout the state, from now through the end of summer, hard ticks will be a main concern, said Justin Talley, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension livestock entomologist. Continue reading

Integrated Tick Management Symposium: Solving America’s Tick-Borne Disease Problem

Integrated Tick Management Symposium:
Solving America’s Tick-Borne Disease Problem

May 16-17, 2016
Washington, D.C.

Plan to join the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Entomological Society of America and the IPM Institute of North America in Washington, DC for the Integrated Tick Management Symposium: Solving America’s Tick-Borne Disease Problem.

The symposium will address the below areas.  To view the agenda, click here. Continue reading

New experimental method may aid in earlier detection of Lyme disease

From Health Medicine Network

When it comes to early diagnosis of Lyme disease, the insidious tick-borne illness that afflicts about 300,000 Americans annually, finding the proverbial needle in the haystack might be a far easier challenge–until now, perhaps. An experimental method developed by federal and university researchers appears capable of detecting the stealthy culprit Lyme bacteria at the earliest time of infection, when currently available tests are often still negative.

The team suggests the approach might also be useful for early detection of other elusive bacterial infections. The collaborators–from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine–recently reported the successful first trial of their new method. Continue reading

NC State researchers study how ticks are attracted to humans

by Mick Kulikowski , NC State University

Researchers have sequenced the genetic blueprint of one of the most prolific pathogen-transmitting agents on the planet – the Lyme-disease-spreading tick (Ixodes scapularis) that bites humans. The findings could lead to advances in not only disrupting the tick’s capacity to spread diseases but also in eradicating the pest.

The large tick genome – smaller than but similar in complexity to the human genome – supports redundancy, said R. Michael Roe, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Entomology at North Carolina State University and a co-author of a paper published in Nature Communications that describes the tick genome. Roe said that the size and complexity of the genome – combined with its duplicative elements – were problematic for tick researchers. Continue reading