University of Kentucky entomologist details ways to prevent tick bites

By Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Tick season is underway and a University of Kentucky entomologist is reminding Kentuckians to take precautions to protect themselves and their loved ones from tick bites.

“In tick-prone areas, check yourself, children and other family members every two hours, and very thoroughly after returning home from hikes and other outdoor activities,” said Lee Townsend, UK extension entomologist in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Common places to find ticks are behind the knees, around the waist, under arms, neck and head.” Continue reading

Collaring the Mice that Carry Lyme Disease-Causing Ticks

White-footed mice in Howard County, Maryland are being collared as part of a study to improve control of the ticks that spread Lyme disease. The mouse collaring research, never before done in Maryland, is a partnership of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Howard County Department of Recreation & Parks (HCRP), and University of Maryland (UMD).

The mouse tracking is part of a larger five-year ARS Tick Management Project evaluating the use of minimal pesticide or integrated pest management methods to lower the number of black-legged ticks. Some of those ticks carry Lyme disease-causing bacteria and are around single-family yards and gardens adjacent to large Howard County parks. Continue reading

About mosquito and tick repellents

by Dawn H. Gouge1,2, Shujuan (Lucy) Li2, Shaku Nair2, Kathleen Walker1, Christopher S. Bibbs3

1Department of Entomology – College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, University of Arizona; 2Cooperative Extension – Arizona Pest Management Center, University of Arizona; 3Anastasia Mosquito Control District, FL

Introduction

Personal repellents (often referred to as “bug sprays“) are substances applied to skin, clothing, or other surfaces to repel or discourage insects and other arthropods such as ticks from feeding on humans. Repellents help people avoid bites from mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting arthropods that may transmit disease-causing pathogens, and allow them to engage freely in outdoor activities. Continue reading

It’s winter – Do I still have to worry about ticks?

Many people let down their guard for themselves and their pets once November comes because the associate the cold weather with fewer insects. However, when it comes to ticks, winter weather in the southern states often does not get cold enough to kill off the entire population of adult ticks. Therefore, it’s important to continue to protect pets and be vigilant during the winter months.

The National Pest Alert for ticks gives information about the most common tick species in the U.S., along with tick biology, disease symptoms and photographs of ticks in different stages. Colored maps also show where residents might find different tick species. Continue reading

Reducing your chances of getting bitten by ticks

Most people know about wearing insect repellent and long pants to prevent getting bitten by ticks, but there are also ways to reduce tick populations in your yards. For instance, making sure that loose leaves are kept to a minimum, treating heavily wooded areas with pesticides meant to kill ticks and mites, and treating some of the animal hosts for ticks are other ways to reduce tick numbers in your yard.

Read Entomology Today to see the detailed suggestions for how to protect yourself from ticks.

Part 2 of tick series: protecting the family

In Southwest Farm Press

by Leilana McKindra, Oklahoma State University

With spring in full bloom and summer well on the way, Oklahoma families heading outdoors to enjoy the warmer temperatures should take extra care to protect themselves against ticks.

Though ticks are active year-round throughout the state, from now through the end of summer, hard ticks will be a main concern, said Justin Talley, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension livestock entomologist. Continue reading

Integrated Tick Management Symposium: Solving America’s Tick-Borne Disease Problem

Integrated Tick Management Symposium:
Solving America’s Tick-Borne Disease Problem

May 16-17, 2016
Washington, D.C.

Plan to join the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Entomological Society of America and the IPM Institute of North America in Washington, DC for the Integrated Tick Management Symposium: Solving America’s Tick-Borne Disease Problem.

The symposium will address the below areas.  To view the agenda, click here. Continue reading