Cotton farmers plagued by deer

In Southeast Farm Press

In recent years, many growers have noticed an increasing incidence of deer feeding in young cotton. There are many theories as to why this may be occurring now relative to years prior.

The most common theories are the loss of aldicarb applied in-furrow for thrips and nematode control, major reductions in peanut acreage in the early to mid-2000s, and the resulting absence of preferred food sources during that time. The number of deer feeding complaints in cotton has risen sharply in the last five years; however, these cases are relatively isolated to fields that regularly encounter noticeably high numbers of deer and fields in close proximity to preferred bedding habitat. Continue reading

Wild hogs continue to be a nuisance for farmers

In Delta Farm Press

Rooting and wallowing by wild hogs cause extensive land and crop damage, which can be stopped only by getting rid of the invasive animals.

Bill Hamrick, a wildlife associate with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said wild hogs use their snouts to turn over soil as they search for food. Continue reading

Specialists to talk about deer, wild pigs Aug. 29 in Marshall

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

An informational meeting about white-tailed deer and wild pigs is set for 5:30 p.m. Aug. 29 in Marshall.

The event, sponsored by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service offices in Harrison and Panola counties, will be at the Marshall Civic Center, 2501 East End Blvd. S. and is free and open to the public. Dinner is included. Continue reading

Texas feral hog workshop attracts a crowd

in Morning Ag Clips

by Angela Moore, Prairie View A&M University

Derrick Banks, CEP Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources at Prairie View A&M University, spoke with constituents over the course of several weeks in Ft. Bend County this spring about the growing nuisance of feral hogs, so he knew that it was a hot-button issue. What he may not have known, however, was that the number of persons attending a workshop about field dressing and processing feral hogs would be double the number initially expected.

More than 50 participants came out to the Yelderman House in Needville, Texas this spring for a feral hog workshop covering field dressing and processing, eradicating and trapping, and nuisance control, including a discussion about technological advancements in trap types and equipment. Bo Haltom, River Bend Deer Processing, lead the Feral Hog Processing demonstration, going through the process step by step, from field dressing to processing, using a 250 pound boar as is found in growing numbers in the Ft. Bend County region. Haltom’s detailed review covered everything from the recommended technique for erecting and dressing the hog to minimize the risk of toxins from diseased organs that are contained in a localized area, from overflowing and contaminating the entire hog, to the best tools and proper techniques for cutting to minimize the amount of fat and to preserve the coat in taxidermy or market condition. Continue reading

Deer are beautiful, but not when they dine on your landscape plants

by Tim Daly, University of Georgia

My backyard was home to several large hostas. These plants prefer shady sites, and they were thriving where I had them planted. Then, one day, they simply disappeared.

All that was left were a few small branches sticking out of the ground. Something had eaten my hostas and the most probable culprits were deer. They tend to cause more problems for homeowners than most other types of wildlife. Continue reading

Are some plants deer-resistant? Not really, say Georgia experts

From Georgia FACES

by Frank M. Watson, University of Georgia

When deer leave the shelter of the woods in search of food, they often inspect the shrubs and flowers in your front yard’s landscape as if they were browsing a buffet.

They will nibble your pansies as an appetizer and then fill up on the azaleas as their main course. Then they’re off to the day lilies for dessert. Continue reading

2015 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Wildlife in the Backyard – a Double-edged Sword

It is wonderful to have wildlife in your backyard until that wildlife damages your plants, disfigures your lawn, or invades your house. Moderated by Mike McQueen and Danielle Carroll, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Cooperative Extension System.  Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.   Note: on December 4, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar.  If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.

Friday, December 4 at 2:00 pm EST

Location: http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/fireant Continue reading