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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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UK research shows urban gardens can aid in pollinator conservation

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

A recent study conducted by University of Kentucky Department of Entomology researchers found that monarch butterflies and various bee species quickly find and use milkweeds in small urban gardens. They showed that monarchs and bees have preferences for the type and size of the plants.

“Our goal was to demonstrate to gardeners and homeowners that they can participate in meaningful pollinator conservation in their own backyard,” said Adam Baker, UK graduate student in the College of the Agriculture, Food and Environment. Continue reading

NCSU golf course and BASF partner to help monarch butterflies

NC State University professor emeritus Harold Coble saw an opportunity to help the threatened monarch butterfly at the Lonnie Poole Golf Course. As a consultant for BASF, Coble knew about the project Living Acres, a BASF effort designed to promote growing milkweeds in non-agricultural areas like golf courses.

Since the Lonnie Poole was established as a sustainable golf course, Coble figured that it would be an ideal place for BASF to establish a monarch butterfly habitat. He approached the golf course management with the idea. Continue reading

Butterflies Get Royal Treatment on Golf Course

In NC State News

by Tim Peeler

Golf courses aren’t just for birdies — the Lonnie Poole Golf Course on NC State’s Centennial Campus is now a habitat for increasingly rare monarch butterflies.

In partnership with Triangle-based chemical company BASF, NC State crop and soil sciences professor emeritus Harold Coble and a corps of volunteers planted some 750 milkweed plants and wildflowers in low-traffic areas of the golf course to become a habitat for the distinctive orange and black butterflies. Continue reading

Trapping Weevils and Saving Monarchs

Ensuring the monarch butterfly’s survival by saving its milkweed habitat could result from U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) studies initially intended to improve detection of boll weevils with pheromone traps.

Continue reading