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Sorghum growers need a solid management plan

In Delta Farm Press

If you’re going to grow grain sorghum this year, you should factor into your plans a solid insect management plan, says Angus Catchot, Mississippi State University Extension professor of entomology and plant pathology.

“Going into the season, have a plan to deal with a few of the most common yield robbers: sugarcane aphid, sorghum midge, and the headworm complex,” he said at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Agricultural Consultants Association. Continue reading

Sugarcane aphid threatens Mississippi grain sorghum

This video is on Delta Farm Press.

The sugarcane aphid is a very destructive pest with an exponential growth rate, and can be devastating to grain sorghum, says Angus Catchot, Mississippi State University Extension professor of entomology and plant pathology, who discussed the pest at the annual meeting of the Mississippi Agricultural Consultants Association.

Pheromone traps are easier ways to scout for corn borer

From Delta Farm Press

If you grow non-Bt corn and you’ve spent a lot of sweaty time in fields scouting for southwestern corn borer egg masses and larvae, Fred Musser has relief for you.

Pheromone traps are just as effective, take less time, and are cheap, he says.

Continue reading

Kudzu bugs: Don’t freak out and spray too soon

In Delta Farm Press

Like the boll weevil in the late 19th century, the kudzu bug has found a home in the U.S., quickly spreading across much of the South, and with few natural enemies, entomologists say it’s likely to be around a long time.

Continue reading