• Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,791 other followers

  • Southern IPM blog posts

    December 2019
    M T W T F S S
    « Sep    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  
  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
  • Southern IPM Tweets

Zika Risk in Texas Rises with Temperatures

As the state prepares for additional local transmission of the Zika virus during the 2017 mosquito season, the Texas Department of State Health Services is expanding its testing guidance for residents of six South Texas counties.

DSHS Monday issued a health alert that now recommends testing all pregnant residents of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata counties in both the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and any resident who has a rash plus at least one other common Zika symptom: fever, joint pain or eye redness. Continue reading

2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Mosquitoes and Insect Borne Diseases

In this webinar, Dr. Derrick Mathias, Assistant Professor, Auburn University will discuss medically important mosquitoes and mosquito-borne viruses endemic to and threatening the Southeast. Learn about mosquito ecology, virus transmission, signs and symptoms of mosquito borne illnesses and how to assess your risk of infection.  Moderated by Ellen Huckabay and Lucy Edwards, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Extension. Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.   Note: on April 7th, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.

When: Friday, April 7 at 2:00 pm EDT Continue reading

Purdue conference focuses on mosquito concerns

In PCT Magazine

With Zika virus grabbing headlines throughout 2016, many pest management professionals found themselves on the frontline as public health protectors, whether it was providing mosquito control services and/or educating the public.

Mosquito control is a different type of service that involves learning new equipment, products and regulations, as well as having a thorough understanding of mosquito biology and behavior. To help PMPs navigate mosquito control better, this year’s Purdue Pest Management Conference included sessions on mosquito management from leading experts. Continue reading

New study suggests more deaths from West Nile virus than predicted

In HealthDay News

by Randy Dotinga, HealthDay News

A new study suggests that the death toll from the mosquito-borne West Nile virus might be much greater than thought because its effects may often kill people months or years after infection.

“We are hoping our research findings will help encourage a push to develop a vaccine that can help prevent disease and premature death,” said study co-author Dr Kristy Murray, an associate professor with National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. “At this time, the only way people can prevent the disease is protecting themselves from mosquito bites, which can sometimes be difficult to do.” Continue reading

Most updated information on Zika

If you want the most up-to-date information on the Zika virus in the U.S. go to the CDC website. The Centers for Disease Control has a plethora of information about the virus, transmission, impact on pregnant women and prevention. There is also information for specific groups, including health care providers and laboratories.

AgriLife Extension entomologists provide advice for women regarding Zika virus

By: Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

Initially, the Zika virus was considered a “mild” disease, but public health officials have become increasingly concerned that pregnant women who contract Zika can pass the virus to their unborn babies, said Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologists.

“The main cause for concern is the possibility the Zika virus may cause microcephaly, a condition where the fetal brain and head do not fully develop and reach normal size,” said Dr. Mike Merchant, AgriLife Extension urban entomologist, Dallas. “Currently, there is no vaccine or preventive treatment for Zika, nor is there a cure for microcephaly.” Continue reading

West Nile outbreak cost Texas $47 million in medical care and lost productivity

From the Star-Telegram

The cost for acute medical care and lost productivity related to the Texas outbreak of West Nile virus in 2012 likely exceeded $47 million, according to a new study released Wednesday.

The state’s 1,886 cases demonstrated the need for ongoing mosquito surveillance and the necessity of developing an effective vaccine, said Dr. Kristy Murray, who led the research conducted by the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Continue reading