Texas A&M AgriLife experts discuss fumonisin contamination, possible avoidance practices

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Texas A&M AgriLife officials are offering some best management practices for producers to keep in mind as harvest continues and for next year after fumonisin contamination has been found in truckloads of corn across the Texas High Plains.

Dr. Tom Isakeit, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist in College Station, said this year nothing can be done to minimize fumonisin already present in the standing crop; however, producers can make a few changes during harvest to possibly reduce the amount of contaminated grain collected. Continue reading

Missouri farmers troubled by diseased wheat

In Delta Farm Press

by Jason Vance, University of Missouri Extension

This year’s record-breaking rain and continued wet weather led to serious problems in Missouri wheat fields. Farmers have had a tough time harvesting the wheat crop, and now disease is making it hard or even impossible to sell, says Pat Westhoff, director of the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at the University of Missouri.

The Wheat Belt has been hit by vomitoxin, a common name for the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol. The Food and Drug Administration has restricted the concentration to 1 part per million for human food products. In higher concentrations, vomitoxin causes feed refusal and poor weight gain in some livestock. Much of the affected wheat has levels high enough that grain elevators won’t accept it.

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New technology to be explored at UK Winter Wheat Meeting

Grain growers will soon get a firsthand look at a new mobile tool to help them make real-time, informed decisions on their fields at the University of Kentucky Wheat Science Group’s annual winter meeting Jan. 6.

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Corn growers can take steps to avoid mycotoxins

From Southeast Farm Press

The issue of mycotoxins in corn isn’t one of the most pleasant conversational topics for corn farmers, but North Carolina Extension Corn Specialist Ron Heiniger stresses that mycotoxins are a major concern in North Carolina that needs to be addressed.

“There are no good mycotoxins. We want it gone, stomped out, eliminated. It’s just like a weed in a field. There is no good weed, and the same is true about mycotoxins,” Heiniger said at a corn aflatoxin control field day held Aug. 14 at the Upper Coastal Plain Research Station’s Fountain Farm in Rocky Mount.

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