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The best defense against fleas is a good offense

By Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

With the first few weeks of hot weather under Georgia’s belt for summer 2018, dog owners across the state may notice their canine companions starting to scratch a little more often.

While fleas are active year-round in Georgia, summer means it’s time to get serious about flea control for pets and for homes.  Continue reading

2018 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series – This Friday on FLEAS

Don’t forget this month’s All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar will take place this Friday, May 4 at 1:00 pm Central Time. Fleas have you down? A pest of both homes and our pets, populations can quickly get away from us. Running and grabbing a pesticide generally doesn’t work unless you understand their biology and life cycle. Join us as Dr. Nancy Hinkle, Professor Veterinary Entomology, University of Georgia, gives a webinar filled with information to help us get flea populations under control BEFORE they escalate. We hope you can attend the webinar live, but if you are unable to make it, a recording will be posted online next week.

Webinar link: https://auburn.zoom.us/j/209793415
Continue reading

Don’t let ticks keep you out of the woods this summer

By Melissa Jackson, University of Georgia

Don’t be afraid of ticks, says Nancy Hinkle, a University of Georgia professor of entomology.

“We need to be aware, we need to be cautious,” she said. Here in the Southeast, you cannot get Lyme disease from a tick in the summer, she said. The carrier is a winter tick, a deer tick. “That’s the time of year when people are most likely to encounter the deer tick.” Continue reading

Tips to prevent ticks

In University of Georgia’s Landscape Alert

Ticks are in every part of Georgia. The most common ticks in Georgia are lone star ticks, carriers of uncommon diseases called “ehrlichiosis.” However, the American dog tick is also present in the state, and it is known to carry Rocky Mountain spotted fever—a flu-like illness that can cause complications for young children and those with suppressed immune systems.

The best course of action to prevent disease is to avoid tick bites altogether, said Nancy Hinkle, a UGA Extension veterinary entomologist.

Continue reading