Steer clear of exotic invasives at garden centers

I know some of you may be wondering why I would imply that a garden center would sell a plant that may be on some of the “most wanted invasives” lists because they hurt native vegetation and tend to run rampant. However, if you’ve ever seen mimosa trees, you know they have pretty, feathery pink flowers, and many homeowners love them. Privet is often sold to create a hedge (and boy, does it ever), and many invasive flowers are fast-spreading and showy, two qualities that customers are looking for in a front-yard planting.

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Nature’s “Melting Pot”: Invasive Species and Ecosystem Value

In Friday’s OpEd section in the New York Times, writer Hugh Raffles offered an interesting–but somewhat inaccurate–view on exotic invasive species. His premise was that invasive species can provide diversity and benefits to the earth, just as new immigrants contribute to the diversity and health of society. You can read the full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/opinion/03Raffles.html?_r=2

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One Person’s Beautiful Plant; Another’s Invasive Nightmare

Although the distinctive sweet scents of honeysuckle and wisteria have always assured me that spring is on its way, by midsummer I find myself battling them in my backyard. While some people welcome these plants, and others with similar growth habits, neither of the plants is native to the United States, and in most cases, are considered invasive pests.

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