Webinar: Considerations for Transitioning Perennial Production to Organic

This webinar is presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology National Technology Support Centers.

Date: Apr 4, 2017 3:00 pm US/Eastern

What will you learn?

Join this webinar to learn about the specifics of transitioning perennial production systems to organic. Learn more… Continue reading

UK helps producer renovate hayfield

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

When Anderson County livestock producer Mike Wilson bought a 60-acre hayfield in Franklin County, he knew he had a lot of work in front of him.

The previous owners had let people cut hay for nearly 30 years without putting any nutrients back into the ground, which meant the existing grass stand was a mixture of Kentucky 31 tall fescue and weeds. Continue reading

Webinar: Introduction to Plant Identification

This webinar is presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology, National Technology Support Centers.

What will you learn?

Participants will be provided a framework for determining the identity of plants. Learn more… Continue reading

Using Adaptive Grazing to Improve Soil Health in Grazing Ecosystems

What will you learn?

This webinar will teach strategies for improving soil function on range and pastures, including an emphasis on management of livestock like large migratory herds in natural systems for proper herd impact and increased nutrient and water cycling in grass ecosystems. Learn more…

Jan 10, 2017 2:00 pm US/Eastern

Presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology Continue reading

Natural Resources Conservation Service providing money to deal with feral hogs in Alabama

In Southeast Farm Press

Farmers in 18 Alabama counties have until Feb. 19 to apply for financial assistance to monitor and manage feral swine on their property.

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service State Conservationist Ben Malone said $100,000 is being made available for Alabama’s Wild Pig Damage Management Program under the Environmental Quality Incentives Program. Continue reading

USDA scientist develops crimper to help roll down cover crops

In Southeast Farm Press

By Dennis O’Brien, Agricultural Research Service

Growers who use cover crops are increasingly turning to a tool that can flatten out their actively growing fields, usually in a single pass. Known as a “roller/crimper,” the technology can help reduce and sometimes eliminate the need for herbicides.

Cover crops can improve soil quality; and in organic operations, they play a major role in keeping weeds in check. Crimpers boost those benefits. They have been used for years in South America and are beginning to catch on in the United States, says Ted Kornecki, an agricultural engineer at the Agricultural Research Service’s National Soil Dynamics Laboratory in Auburn, Alabama. He has conducted a study evaluating several crimpers to give guidance to growers and has patented three crimper designs. Continue reading

Cover crops can add nutrients and help with weed control

by Scott Miller, Clemson University

Dorchester County farmer Jimmy Fender was skeptical, opting reluctantly to skip fertilizer treatments and rely on cover crops for the nutrients that would feed his cash crop.

Fender planted a mix of clover, vetch and radish in September 2014 to serve as winter cover on about 100 acres of cornfield. In late March, he killed the cover and tilled it into the soil, which added an estimated 90 pounds per acre of nitrogen to his field. As part of a trial test with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Fender skipped some fertilizer treatments in part of that field. In the end, yields were close to those where more fertilizer was applied. Continue reading