Emerald ash borer now in Great Smoky Mountains

The first backcountry emerald ash borer infestation has been confirmed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Continue reading

Stink bugs moving indoors

As the temperature drops, many insects will search for shelter for the winter months—many times in private residences. This year, people may notice a new insect coming indoors.

Continue reading

American chestnut is back, say Western NC scientists

From the Asheville Citizen-Times

Today, they are practically extinct, these giant living things that once called the mountains of Western North Carolina home. But, thanks to a grand experiment that sounds almost like something out of a real-life version of “Jurassic Park,” a mighty species once thought to have vanished from the world is making a comeback.

Continue reading

Trapping Weevils and Saving Monarchs

Ensuring the monarch butterfly’s survival by saving its milkweed habitat could result from U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) studies initially intended to improve detection of boll weevils with pheromone traps.

Continue reading

LSU AgCenter releases more weevils to fight aquatic weed

From Delta Farm Press

Dearl Sanders calls himself a bug chauffeur. The LSU AgCenter scientist is trying to move as many salvinia weevils as he can to combat the invasive aquatic plant giant salvinia, which is clogging waterways across Louisiana.

Continue reading

What’s in a name? A species common name, that is

When scientists discover a new species–whether it is an insect, pathogen, weed, animal or aquatic species–they give it two names. One is the scientific name that will be used for the rest of the species’ existence to refer to the species, and the other is the “common name,” or the name that you will usually see in media reports. These names can take months, sometimes years or research before scientists formally present them, but while scientists are debating back and forth what the best name is, others will choose a common name just so they have a reference to the species, especially if they are trying to alert the public to be on alert.

Continue reading