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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Recognizing sweet potato black rot and scurf

In North Carolina Plant Pathology

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Black rot of sweetpotato is caused by the seed and soil borne fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata.  Root symptoms include large circular, brownish to black, dry rots. Plant symptoms in the field include plant stunting, wilting, yellowing, leaf drop, and death. Infections start in the field but can further develop in storage and even small lesions in the root can cause devastating damage if conditions favor disease.

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Worms reported in early season North Carolina soybeans

In Southeast Farm Press

There are reports of worms in early season soybeans in North Carolina, but at this point density levels aren’t a concern, according to North Carolina Extension entomologist Dominic Reisig.

After sampling numerous fields, Reisig says there are spots where corn earworm and tobacco budworm are present. In a blog posting, Reisig explained that identification is the first step if worms are present in your soybeans.

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N.C. State scientists work to stop the spread of fungus that attacks popular landscape plant

Since colonial days, the boxwood has been an important part of American gardens and landscapes. Research from N.C. State University is designed to help keep it that way, in spite of the threat to the plant posed by a disease new to the United States.

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