Kudzu bugs move toward Arkansas soybeans

In Delta Farm Press

by Ryan McGeeney, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture

After almost five years of waiting, the inevitable has finally arrived: Kudzu bugs have made their way across the Delta, into Arkansas, and are poised to begin affecting soybeans in the fall.

The pest, which overwinters in kudzu, was first detected in Arkansas in 2013, mostly in small numbers. Robert Goodson, Phillips County agricultural agent for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said that only within recent weeks had the pest been discovered in large numbers in a commercial soybean field near Helena, Ark. Continue reading

Kudzu bugs are now in Arkansas

In the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension news

by Mary Hightower, University of Arkansas

Kudzu bugs, a fast-moving, invasive pest of soybeans, have been confirmed in Arkansas, but the ones found in Crittenden County probably arrived too late to do any damage to the state’s bean crop, Nick Seiter, extension entomologist for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said Monday.

Kudzu bugs, a native of Asia, were first found in a handful of counties in Georgia in 2009. Since then, their range exploded to span the South. Last December, Jeremy Greene, professor of entomology at Clemson, told those at the Tri-State Soybean Forum in Dumas that the bugs’ presence in Arkansas was not a matter of “if,” but “when.” Continue reading

Mid-south still battling sugarcane aphid

From Delta Farm Press

As harvest nears, the white sugarcane aphid continues its residency in much of the Mid-South’s grain sorghum.

“This pest jumps out pretty quickly,” said Nick Seiter, University of Arkansas entomologist. “It can hit high numbers very quickly. There have been a lot of acres sprayed for it. At least half the crop has been sprayed or should have been. It’s become a major concern for milo throughout the state.”

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Sugarcane Aphids Invade Arkansas Sorghum; Treatment Options Limited

Source: University of Arkansas Press Release. www.uaex.edu and Plant Management Network

 Grain sorghum growers in east Arkansas are discovering a new visitor: the sugarcane aphid has been showing up since June on the plant’s leaves in Ashley, Chicot, Desha and Phillips counties and it’s considered likely to spread to nearby areas. Its damage symptoms include sticky honeydew and yellow to reddish brown leaf discoloration.

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