Making Cover Crops Work in No-Till Vegetable Production – workshop in South Carolina

Join our cover crop specialists for a practical look at using cover crops for no-till production. We’ll start in the classroom for an update on our USDA cover crop research project, and a discussion on nuts and bolts information like varieties, seeding methods, seeding rates, termination methods, planting vegetables into residue, and lessons learned related to all those things. Then we’ll head to the field (Student Organic Farm in Clemson and CREC Research Farm in Charleston) to look at plots, cover crop termination, and depending on timing we could observe planting vegetables into residue. We’ll finish with lunch and Q&A. We’ll also have some print resources available.  Each participant will receive a copy of the Sustainable Agriculture, Research and Education Program’s publication “Managing Cover Crops Profitably”. Continue reading

Making Cover Crops Work in No-Till Vegetable Production

Join Clemson University cover crop specialists for a practical look at using cover crops for no-till production. We’ll start in the classroom for an update on our USDA cover crop research project, and a discussion on nuts and bolts information like varieties, seeding methods, seeding rates, termination methods, planting vegetables into residue, and lessons learned related to all those things. Then we’ll head to the field (Student Organic Farm in Clemson and CREC Research Farm in Charleston) to look at plots, cover crop termination, and depending on timing we could observe planting vegetables into residue. We’ll finish with lunch and Q&A. We’ll also have some print resources available.  Each participant will receive a copy of the Sustainable Agriculture, Research and Education Program’s publication “Managing Cover Crops Profitably”.

Charleston, SC, April 19th

Coastal Research and Education Center

2700 Savannah Hwy

Clemson, SC, May 11th

Madren Conference Center

230 Madren Center Dr. Continue reading

Cover crops can be beneficial with informed decisions

In Southwest Farm Press

A cover crop used in conjunction with a conservation tillage system may help conserve soil and improve soil health, fertility, water quality, weed/disease/pest control, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat.

But it requires “educated management decisions,” says Paul DeLaune, Texas AgriLife Research agronomist at Vernon, Texas. He discussed ongoing cover crop research on the Texas Rolling Plains during the Red River Crops Conference. Continue reading

Interest in no-till is increasing in Texas

in Southwest Farm Press

by Ron Smith, Southwest Farm Press

Texas cotton farmers are beginning to show more interest in no-till production, says Bobbie McMichael, and he advises that keeping residue on fields will improve soil health.

The Texas Tech University biology professor, speaking at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in Dallas, said residue from cover crops and from previous plantings with no-till and reduced tillage systems, offers numerous benefits to the soil, including reducing water runoff, improving infiltration, and limiting soil erosion. It also benefits the soil and crop in a less visible way, improving microbial activity, especially fungi, which he says are more beneficial to soil and plant health than bacteria.

Read the rest of the story in Southwest Farm Press.

Tennessee field day on no-till reports research results

The 29th Milan No-Till Field Day tour, sponsored by the University of Tennessee, summarizes outcomes from a year of research in a report available on the web. You can find the report here. Below is the table of contents from the report: Continue reading

Murdock honored by nation’s agriculture extension agents

By Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Over the past four decades, Lloyd Murdock, University of Kentucky extension soils specialist, has helped farmers across the state and region improve their operations. His efforts have not gone unnoticed.

Murdock recently received the Service to American/World Agriculture award from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents during their annual conference in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is the highest award given by the organization and recognizes the award winner’s major contributions to agriculture. Continue reading

AgriLife Research: Rotation, cover crops impact cotton yields more than tillage

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

After eight years of research on no-till advantages and disadvantages with cotton crops, Dr. Paul DeLaune is convinced it’s not as much about the tillage as it is about the cover crop and/or rotation.

DeLaune, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research environmental soil scientist in Vernon, said he has compared no-till, strip till and conventional till, as well as cotton with a terminated wheat crop in the Rolling Plains. Continue reading