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European study shows various results with neonic-honey bee interactions

A study in Europe that tested bee health in neonicotinoid treated fields had different results in two countries, supporting previous statements that bee declines are the result of multiple factors.

The study, which was the largest field study ever conducted on bees and neonics, was featured in Science this past week. Scientists monitored bees in 33 locations in the United Kingdom, Germany and Hungary. Bees in each location were in canola fields, some of which had been treated with neonics and fungicides and others that were treated only with fungicides. Continue reading

Mosquito preferences for people is in the genes

In National Public Radio. (you can listen to the podcast also if you follow the link)

A study that asked a few dozen pairs of twins to brave a swarm of hungry mosquitoes has revealed another clue to the cluster of reasons the insects are more attracted to some people than others: Genes matter.

Continue reading

Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent ‘Reservoirs’

From New Hampshire Public Radio

by Joel Rose

New York City is launching the latest salvo in its never-ending war on rats.

City officials are ramping up efforts to teach regular New Yorkers how to make their streets, businesses and gardens less hospitable to rodents — in other words, to see their neighborhood the way a health inspector would.

Continue reading

Rust Devastates Guatemala’s Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

Outside the northern Guatemalan town of Olopa, near the Honduran border, farmer Edwin Fernando Diaz Viera stands in the middle of his tiny coffee field. He says it was his lifelong dream to own a farm here. The area is renowned for producing some of the world’s richest arabica, the smooth-tasting beans beloved by specialty coffee brewers.

“My farm was beautiful; it was big,” he says.

But then, a plant fungus called coffee rust, or roya in Spanish, hit his crop.

“Coffee rust appeared and wiped out everything,” he says.

Continue reading

New Orleans’ Rat Fighters Go Beyond Baiting Traps

On National Public Radio

Marvin Thompson knew he faced a difficult task when he was hired last year as principal at John McDonogh High School in New Orleans.

“The day that I pulled up to this building, I thought it was condemned,” Thompson says.

Continue reading