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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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“Good-Guy” Fungus to Take on Killer of Oaks and Ornamental Crops

by Jan Suszkiw, USDA Agricultural Research Service

A beneficial soil fungus could offer a biobased approach to battling Phytophthora ramorum, a pathogen that kills oaks, other tree species and woody ornamentals.

BioWorks, Inc. of Victor, New York, is collaborating with Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant pathologist Tim Widmer to commercially formulate the fungus, Trichoderma asperellum. The species is a mycoparasite, meaning it attacks and kills other fungi, including P. ramorum, a fungus-like pathogen, notes Widmer, with ARS in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Continue reading

APHIS Changes Requirements for Movement of Soil from Phytophthora ramorum Quarantined Areas for Analysis

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is revising the conditions for the interstate movement of regulated soil from Phytophthora ramorum quarantined areas when the soil is moving to an APHIS-approved soil laboratory for physical or chemical analysis. This action removes the certification requirement and authorizes movement under a compliance agreement. The movement of bulk soil for other purposes (e.g., disposal, landscaping, use in potting media) is not included in this action and will continue to require certificates per the Code of Federal Regulations (7 CFR 301.92). This action does not include soil to be moved for the isolation of plant pests, which is regulated in accordance with 7 CFR, Part 330. Continue reading

Research indicates new hosts for two major plant diseases

The Plant Management Network highlights two research projects this month that have uncovered new possible hosts for two deadly forest diseases: laurel wilt and Phytophthora ramorum.

Vectored by the redbay ambrosia beetle, laurel wilt attacks species in the Lauraceae family, causing death within a few years. Recently, scientists tested Persea indica, a tree species native to the Madeira and Canary Islands, for its attractiveness to the redbay ambrosia beetle. The beetle preferred P. indica over Persea borbonia (redbay), its primary host in the U.S.

Continue reading