IPM keeps food on our table–at a price we can afford

I read a blog article today written by one of the Southwest Farm Press editors, resolving to eat more doughnuts in 2018. The editor, Shelley Huguley, discussed how one of America’s favorite treats was in jeopardy because of a pest insect that attacks sugarcane, the sugarcane borer. Although I didn’t come up with the idea to discuss the idea of pest management in terms of the products that we love, I know a great idea when I see one, so I decided to take her idea and run with it to talk about our own contributions to America’s products.

Keeping products in our homes is just one of the benefits for good pest management. With so many insects and diseases that can adapt to a single pest management technique, such as a particular pesticide, scientists have to get creative to make sure farmers and others who need to manage pests can do it at a cost that won’t break America’s banks. Continue reading

Newly funded projects will further IPM in vegetable, cotton and residential pest management

Nine researchers will pursue new methods for fighting a variety of pest management challenges in the South, in both agricultural and urban settings. Over the next year, the Southern IPM Center will spend a total of $257,724 to address issues in the region including bed bugs in multifamily housing, soybean looper, pecan bacterial scorch, tawny crazy ant and others with its IPM Enhancement Grant.

The IPM Enhancement Grant is one of the funding mechanisms that the Southern IPM Center uses to support and expand integrated pest management research and extension in the southern region. The annual competition begins with a request for proposals in September, with new projects funded by March of the next year. Continue reading