Register for the 9th International IPM Symposium today

Pollinator protection, biopesticide technology, and resistance management will be featured at the 9th International Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Symposium, March 19-22, 2018 at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland USA. The symposium is the premier global event for networking with leading scientists and learning the latest technologies for effectively managing pests. Those who register by February 19 will pay a reduced price.  Continue reading

Pesticide resistant, crop threatening whiteflies found in Texas

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

A pesticide-resistant population of common plant-damaging whiteflies has been found in Texas, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

Whiteflies are sucking, insect pests similar to aphids, and damage ornamental and food plants, said Erfan Vafaie, AgriLife Extension program specialist in integrated pest management, Overton. Adults are winged while young whiteflies lie flat against leaves and can be difficult to see with the naked eye.  Continue reading

EPA Guidance on Managing Pesticide Resistance

EPA has released two Pesticide Registration Notices (PRNs) aimed at combating pesticide resistance.

  • PRN 2017-1, “Guidance for Pesticide Registrants on Pesticide Resistance Management Labeling” offers general guidance on resistance management labeling for all conventional agricultural insecticides, fungicides and herbicides.
  • PRN 2017-2, “Guidance for Herbicide Resistance Management Labeling, Education, Training, and Stewardship” focuses specifically on herbicides and provides guidance on labels, terms of registration, education, training and stewardship.

Continue reading

Why did my fungicide fail?

In Southeast Farm Press

Plant pathologist Bob Kemerait offers five reasons why fungicide programs fail.

It’s one of the most common questions I get during the back-half of the growing season: “Why didn’t my fungicide work?” Continue reading

Crop Protection Contributions toward Agricultural Productivity

The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) is releasing an issue paper titled Crop Protection Contributions toward Agricultural Productivity–a paper in the series on The Need for Agricultural Innovation to Sustainably Feed the World by 2050. The presenter will be Dr. Susan Ratcliffe, task force chair of the project and director of the North Central IPM Center at the University of Illinois.

Pre-register here.

The authors of the paper examine the current plant protection revolution that is driven by the biological realities of pesticide resistance, various market forces, and real or perceived side effects of pesticides, while stressing the need for new technologies and an integrated cropping systems approach.

CAST Issue Paper 58 will be available April 5 as a free download from the CAST website, Continue reading

Pesticide resistant head lice

Pediculosis, or “lousiness”, is one of the most prevalent communicable conditions in the United States. Head lice can infest people of all ages, but children are prone to infestations due to their play activity and close physical contact. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “an estimated 6 million to 12 million infestations occur each year in the United States among children 3 to 11 years of age.” 

According to a new paper (Yoon 2015) delivered at the American Chemical Society head lice are now tougher to control than ever. In 25 states head lice have become highly resistant to the most commonly used lice shampoo treatments, including pyrethrins and the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin. In fact, most states (104 out of 109 samples) tested so far have lice that are resistant to these over-the-counter lice treatment options (Yoon 2015). Continue reading

Pests can develop resistance to non-chemical control methods

By Richard Levine

Agricultural pests, such as insects and weeds, can be incredibly adept at developing resistance to control methods. When you mention the word “resistance,” most people probably think of pests becoming resistant to certain chemicals — weeds becoming herbicide resistant, or insects becoming resistant to insecticides, for example.

However, there are many other types of resistance. Dr. Alison Van Eenennaam, the 2014 recipient of the Borlaug CAST Communication Award, recently explained that weeds can become resistant to mechanical control methods — such as mowing or tilling.

See the rest of the story at Entomology Today.