Assistant professor position at Auburn

The Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology of the College of Agriculture at Auburn University is seeking applications for the position of Assistant Professor- Insect Vector Borne Plant Diseases. This faculty position will be a nine-month, tenure-track position with a 75% research and 25% teaching appointment. The projected start date is August 16, 2018.

Responsibilities: The successful candidate will be responsible for developing a nationally recognized program on fundamental aspects of insect vector borne plant diseases. The successful candidate will lead a vigorous research program on understanding insect vector biology, plant pathogen(s), and interact ion( s) between insect vector(s) and plant pathogens associated with crops of agricultural importance for Alabama and the U.S. The successful candidate will use diverse approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and population genetics to understand the molecular mechanisms associated with insect vectors and plant pathogens. A candidate with state of the art skills in next generation sequencing, comparative genomics and bioinformatics, genetic manipulations, and statistical analyses will be appropriate for this position. The successful candidate will be expected to secure extramural funding to support programs and summer salary, publish technical and refereed articles, and collaborate effectively with departmental faculty and colleagues in related disciplines. Continue reading

Why did my fungicide fail?

In Southeast Farm Press

Plant pathologist Bob Kemerait offers five reasons why fungicide programs fail.

It’s one of the most common questions I get during the back-half of the growing season: “Why didn’t my fungicide work?” Continue reading

Use Social Media to Capture and Track Crop Diseases

In Farm2Ranch

Farmers, agronomists, crop consultants and specialists now have a place to collectively document and track corn and soybean diseases this growing season.

The Twitter accounts @corndisease and @soydisease will be used to upload photos of crop diseases as they show up across the country. This effort is part of the Integrated Pest Information Platform for Education and Extension (iPiPE). The hope is to use tweets of crop disease photos from around the country for future disease tracking and prevention purposes. Continue reading

APHIS will accept proposals for FY 2018 NCPN cooperative agreements from July 17, 2017 through October 6, 2017

The NCPN provides high-quality, propagated plant material that is free of plant pathogens and pests that can cause economic losses to the American specialty crop industry. USDA’s goal is to create an effective, uniform, consistent, efficient, and highly self-sufficient network of clean plant centers serving the needs of specialty crop industry.

Funding will be provided to Land-Grant Universities, Non Land-Grant Colleges of Agriculture, State Agricultural Experiment Stations, State Governments, and Federal Agencies to support implementation and ongoing activities of the NCPN. Continue reading

UGA Extension’s newest plant pathologist to focus on management of plant-parasitic nematodes

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest plant pathologist will focus on improved control of plant-parasitic nematodes, the microscopic, worm-like pests that primarily feed on the roots of vegetable crops.

Nematologist Abolfazl Hajihassani is now responsible for control of the pest in more than 20 Georgia commodities, including bell peppers, tomatoes and cucumbers. Based out of the UGA Tifton campus, Hajihassani hopes his research and expertise will help producers manage the devastating pest. Continue reading

UK research seeks to quantify cover crop benefits

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Farmers use cover crops to control soil erosion, but they may have additional benefits to the soil and subsequent crops. A group of university researchers, including two scientists from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, are seeking to find and quantify these additional benefits.

Erin Haramoto and Montse Salmeron, UK assistant professors, are part of a team that includes researchers from the University of Nebraska and The Ohio State University. They received more than $460,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute for Food and Agriculture for the study. Continue reading

Tomato trials show fertilization, grafting are keys to success

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Statewide tomato trials revealed a fertilization program can help plants reach their production potential, in some locations over 30 pounds of fruit per plant, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

Dr. Joe Masabni, an AgriLife Extension small-acreage horticulturist in Overton, has concluded his 2017 tomato trial investigating grafted versus non-grafted plants and fertilization programs pertaining to yields. Continue reading