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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Identify pests before applying pesticides

by Amanda Tedrow, University of Georgia

Pesticides, which include insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and more, can contain organic or conventional ingredients. People use them in homes and workplaces, on farms and in gardens, and in other places where they want to control pests like weeds, insects, fungi, rodents and plant viruses.

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension urges all Georgians to learn more about the safe use, storage and disposal of pesticides. The UGA Extension Pesticide Safety Education Program promotes the safe, responsible use of pesticides by individuals and commercial groups by providing training programs, materials and educational resources that cover pest identification, personal safety, safe storage and safe disposal of pesticides. Continue reading

WEBINAR: Managing Rose Rosette Disease in the Landscape

Rose Rosette Disease (RRD) has been making an unwelcome appearance in landscapes across the United States. A virus carried by an eriophyid mite, this disease can affect all cultivated roses, including shrubs, hybrid teas, floribunda, grandifloras, and miniatures. Researchers and breeders are hard at work developing solutions to combat RRD. In the meantime, there are many steps landscapers can take to help prevent its spread.

Don’t miss the opportunity to attend this free webinar hosted by Star Roses and Plants and presented by a panel of RRD experts. Continue reading

University of Florida is using vegetable grafting to manage diseases in crops

by Jose Perez, University of Florida

Grafting has been used for thousands of years to propagate and improve tree crops.   For vegetable crops this technique is relatively new. Use of grafting for disease management in vegetable production was first introduced about 90 years ago in watermelon to help manage fusarium wilt, said Dr. Xin Zhao, an Associate Professor at the Horticultural Sciences Department of the University of Florida. Vegetable grafting has been used extensively in Asian countries such as China, Japan, and South Korea; primarily employed to help manage soilborne diseases in intensive cultivation systems. Continue reading

Annual Wheatheart Wheat Conference set for Aug. 11 in Perryton

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

The 18th annual Wheatheart Wheat Conference will be Aug. 11 at the Ochiltree County Expo Center, 402 Expo Drive, Perryton.

The event is hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service offices in Hansford, Hemphill, Hutchinson, Lipscomb, Roberts and Ochiltree counties. Continue reading

New turfgrass handbook available through AgriLife Extension

Homeowners and professional turfgrass managers now have a new Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service publication available to help them when selecting herbicides, insecticides and fungicides to control common turfgrass pests.

Weed, Insect, and Disease Control in Turfgrass was authored by AgriLife Extension turfgrass specialists Dr. Casey Reynolds, College Station; Dr. Matt Elmore, Dallas; and Dr. Young-Ki Jo, College Station; as well as Diane Silcox Reynolds, a postdoctoral research associate. Continue reading

USDA Secretary Vilsack Announces $58.25 Million to Protect Agriculture and Plants from Pests and Diseases Through 2014 Farm Bill Section 10007

U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has allocated $58.25 million from Section 10007 of the 2014 Farm Bill. This money will support 434 projects that prevent the introduction or spread of plant pests and diseases that threaten U.S. agriculture and the environment and ensure the availability of a healthy supply of clean plant stock in the United States. Funding will be provided to 50 States plus Guam and Puerto Rico to implement projects suggested by universities, States, Federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations, non-profits and Tribal organizations. Continue reading

Variety choice more important than chemicals when it comes to nematodes

In Delta Farm Press

Unlike pigweeds or plant bugs, nematodes are an out-of-sight, out-of-mind pest. Left untreated, however, this parasitic organism in the roots of a cotton plant can substantially reduce cotton yield. Resistant cotton varieties are becoming more critical in combatting this pest.

In west Texas, variety choice is more important than chemical control of nematodes because variety response is more consistent year after year than chemical response, according to Terry Wheeler, Texas A&M University plant pathologist. “Root-knot nematode occurs in about 40 percent of our cotton acreage, and reniform occurs in less than 1 percent. Our resistant cotton varieties are resistant to root-knot. Continue reading