Know your FRAC codes

Don’t know what a FRAC code is? It’s important when dealing with fungicide resistance. In this blog post at UT Crops, authors Alice Cochran (Graduate Research Asst.) and Heather Kelly (Extension Plant Pathologist) discuss what FRAC codes are and why it’s important when you’re rotating fungicides. FRAC stands for the Fungicide Resistance Action Committee, and although the authors focus on Tennessee, the recommendations apply to anyone in any state in the U.S. Continue reading

Corn growers can take steps to avoid mycotoxins

From Southeast Farm Press

The issue of mycotoxins in corn isn’t one of the most pleasant conversational topics for corn farmers, but North Carolina Extension Corn Specialist Ron Heiniger stresses that mycotoxins are a major concern in North Carolina that needs to be addressed.

“There are no good mycotoxins. We want it gone, stomped out, eliminated. It’s just like a weed in a field. There is no good weed, and the same is true about mycotoxins,” Heiniger said at a corn aflatoxin control field day held Aug. 14 at the Upper Coastal Plain Research Station’s Fountain Farm in Rocky Mount.

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Southern corn rust found in eastern North Carolina

From Southeast Farm Press

Southern Corn Rust has been found in Lenoir and Wayne counties in eastern North Carolina and farmers need to scout their fields and be prepared to make a fungicide application, according to researchers at North Carolina State University.

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Some Kentucky wheat growers finding disease at harvest

Mother Nature threw some curve balls to the wheat crop over the growing season. Now at harvest time, some growers are finding out their crop safely weathered the season, while others are discovering they struck out.

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Kachroos’ labs make discovery in plant disease resistance

University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment scientists have identified more key components to activating disease resistance in plants.

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Cold weather effects on diseases

We’ve heard a lot of expert opinions on the effect that cold weather has on insect populations. But what about plant disease pathogens? University of Tennessee Extension Plant Pathologist Heather Young Kelly discusses how this year’s cold winter will affect–or not–the incidence of disease in the South.

UK researchers identify key component in plant disease resistance

A team of University of Kentucky researchers led by plant pathologists Aardra and Pradeep Kachroo have discovered an important component in plants’ ability to resist bacterial and viral pathogens.

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Target spot severity varies among cotton varieties

From Southeast Farm Press

Target spot has created much concern among cotton growers in the Southeast over the past few years and began showing up in cotton fields in the Carolinas and Virginia for the first time last year.

Little is known about the impact of the fungal disease on yield and quality, but recent research indicates there may be significant differences among varieties.

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Friends of IPM Award Program Includes Graduate Students for First Time

The 2013 Friends of Southern IPM competition for the Southern IPM Center introduced a major change of its own—the first winners of a new competition specifically for graduate students.

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Funding Extension vital to research success

Reduction of funding for agricultural research and extension programs may give the appearance of saving taxpayer dollars, but the reduction in resources often means that sudden agricultural crises cost more. For instance, the entrance of soybean rust could have cost soybean growers millions of dollars in losses or wasted usage of fungicides had it not been for a quick, targeted outreach effort by extension plant pathologists. Apple growers in Kentucky would have faced possibly huge losses to codling moth because of OP insecticide cancellations if University of Kentucky extension specialists had not demonstrated a new IPM management program that is now increasing yields beyond those growers saw when they relied on the former insecticide. Yet those university extension resources are currently threatened with increasing federal and state funding cuts, according to a letter to the editor of Phytopathology journal.

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