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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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NC State University student spotlight on pollinator protection

In NC State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences News

by Chelsea Kellner, NC State University

As pollinator gardens grow in popularity, Marisol Mata wants to make sure they are giving North Carolina’s native bees the nutrition they need to thrive.

Her work can also help us glimpse the future — how changes in global weather patterns could affect nutrition for one of our smallest but most important eco-partners. Continue reading

New apiary on Centennial Campus teaches bee management

by Carla Davis, NC State University

The newest buzz at NC State is emanating from nearly 150,000 honeybees that now call Centennial Campus home.

On the day before Earth Day, a new community apiary with seven honeybee hives was inaugurated on Main Campus Drive between the Hunt Library and Lake Raleigh. Under the high noon sun, leaders from university offices and local businesses donned beekeeping jackets, veils and gloves to release the bees on campus. Continue reading

Bayer Bee Care partners with Wildlife Society to plant pollinator-friendly flowers

In Southeast Farm Press

The Bayer Bee Care program and the Wildlife Society are working together toward the goal of planting 25 million pollinator-attractant wildflower seeds by the fall with the aim  of increasing nutrition options for honeybees.

The Wildlife Society will engage its nearly 10,000 members to identify key areas in the U.S. in need of more forage and announce where the millions of seeds will be planted at its 23rd Annual Conference in Raleigh, N.C., in October. The planting will occur later in the fall, just in time for the pollinator buffet to bloom and establish spring 2017 forage. Continue reading

Attracting Pollinators to your Home Garden (in the South)

by Dr. Danesha Seth Carley, co-Director, Southern IPM Center

General Suggestions

You can attract butterflies and other insect pollinators to your yard or garden by growing plants that are attractive to both humans and pollinators (see list below for suggestions). You do not need a formal garden to include plants that will attract and support pollinators; even small patches of plants can help.

When choosing plants for your pollinator habitat, it is always best to aim for plant diversity. Consider that the bees and butterflies you want to attract need either food or habitat year-round. By including a variety of blooming herbs, trees and shrubs, vines as well as annuals and perennials in your garden, you will be not only attracting native pollinators, but also providing them a year-round place to thrive. Continue reading