Thanks to pollinator gardens, insect-watching has become a popular pastime

By Becky Griffin, University of Georgia

Move over bird-watchers! Backyard insect-watching has become a popular pastime thanks to the public’s increased interest in pollinator health and habitats.

Gardeners enjoy seeing insects visit their gardens. Learning about the types of the bees and the wing colors of migrating butterflies can enrich the pollinator experience in the home garden. Continue reading

Trees for Bees: Pollinator Habitats in Urban Forests

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry.

Title: Trees for Bees: Pollinator Habitats in Urban Forests Continue reading

Feed A Bee announces plantings to celebrate National Honey Bee Day

In Morning Ag Clips

Mark your calendars now! August 19 is National Honey Bee Day, and Bayer’s Feed a Bee will be buzzing across the country to plant thousands of wildflowers from New York toCalifornia – all in one day.

Since 2015, the Feed a Bee initiative has distributed over 3 billion wildflower seeds for pollinator plantings, establishing additional nutrition and habitat sources across the nation. This National Honey Bee Day, Feed a Bee will be celebrating with special planting events to add even more to the pollinator gardens at Bethpage State Park in Farmingdale, New YorkNorth Central College in Naperville, Illinois, and thePlacer Land Trust’s School Park Community Garden inAuburn, California. Continue reading

Weed seeds may be included in some pollinator mixes

Reposted from The Connection, North Central IPM Center

by Diana Yates

Weed scientists in at least two Midwestern states have been reporting for years that a conservation program meant to provide habitat for pollinating insects is sowing bad seeds – including seeds of the potentially devastating agricultural weed Palmer amaranth – along with the good. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois have traced the weed seeds to at least one source: pollinator habitat seed sold by a company in the Midwest.

A tag on the seed mix claims it is 100 percent weed-free. The provider of the seed, whom the researchers declined to name, is one of dozens of companies that sells seed mixes used in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pollinator Habitat Initiative and Conservation Reserve Program. Continue reading