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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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NCPIRG wants students to think about the bees this Thanksgiving

by Jerry Jiang, Daily Tar Heel

People become accustomed to the habit of expecting Thanksgiving to simply come along every November, but in the words of North Carolina Public Interest Research Group’s slogan, ‚ÄúNo bees, no Thanksgiving.‚ÄĚ

State senator Mike Woodard spoke at the Bee-Saving event, hosted by Edible Campus UNC behind Davis Library as part of NCPIRG’s Save the Bees campaign.  Continue reading

Xerces Society seeks Pollinator Conservation Specialist / Agronomist

Location: Preference is to locate this position at a home office in Minnesota or North Dakota. For the right candidate, we may consider additional location options.

Start Date: Hiring preference will go to candidates available to start in early to mid-January; some flexibility of start date exists.
The Xerces Society manages the largest and most advanced pollinator conservation program in the world and we offer unparalleled career opportunities for participating in some of the most cutting-edge wildlife conservation happening today. Continue reading

NC State University student spotlight on pollinator protection

In NC State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences News

by Chelsea Kellner, NC State University

As pollinator gardens grow in popularity, Marisol Mata wants to make sure they are giving North Carolina’s native bees the nutrition they need to thrive.

Her work can also help us glimpse the future ‚ÄĒ how changes in global weather patterns could affect nutrition for one of our smallest but most important eco-partners. Continue reading

Participate in the First Ever Mite-A-Thon

A single Varroa mite infestation can quickly spread and devastate hives across an entire region. Early detection and control are key to supporting honey bee health and preventing catastrophic infestations. That’s why the Honey Bee Health Coalition, which has developed essential Varroa mite resources, is proud to support the first ever Mite-A-Thon.

The Coalition urges beekeepers to participate in this exciting and free event by visiting www.pollinator.org/miteathon. Continue reading

Finding of self-medicating behavior in bees not supported in further research

In Morning Ag Clips

A new study of possible self-medicating behavior in bumble bees conducted by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst reports that a once-promising finding was not supported by further experiments and analysis.

Doctoral candidate Evan Palmer-Young and his advisor, evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler, had reported in 2015 that a common parasitic infection of bumble bees was reduced when the bees fed on anabasine in sugar water. Anabasine is a natural alkaloid, nicotine-like chemical found in plant nectar. The researchers had hoped their finding was evidence that bees may use ‚Äúnature‚Äôs medicine cabinet‚ÄĚ to rid themselves of the intestinal parasite¬†Crithidia bombi, which can decrease the survival of queen bees over the winter and hamper the success of young colonies in the spring. Continue reading

Protecting Pollinators in Urban Landscapes ‚Äď Save the Date

Two years ago Elsa Youngsteadt and Steve Frank from NC State joined forces with Dave Smitley, Heidi Wollaeger, and others from Michigan State University to organize the first national conference related to pollinator conservation in ornamental plant production and urban landscapes. Over 150 people with jobs in research, extension, industry, government, or NGOs spent 3 days in the North Carolina mountains with a lineup of renowned international speakers.

But this conference was not just about listening; it was also about talking and discussing pressing issues such as insecticide safety and habitat conservation. Folks studying bee conservation had dinner with folks from agrochemical companies. Extension folks trying to find real-world pest management solutions had beers with beekeepers and conservationists. Many of these interactions may not have ever happened without this conference. Continue reading

Feed A Bee announces plantings to celebrate National Honey Bee Day

In Morning Ag Clips

Mark your calendars now!¬†August 19¬†is National Honey Bee Day, and Bayer’s Feed a Bee will be buzzing across the country to plant thousands of wildflowers from¬†New York¬†toCalifornia¬†‚Äď all in one day.

Since 2015, the Feed a Bee initiative has distributed over 3 billion wildflower seeds for pollinator plantings, establishing additional nutrition and habitat sources across the nation. This National Honey Bee Day, Feed a Bee will be celebrating with special planting events to add even more to the pollinator gardens at Bethpage State Park in Farmingdale, New York, North Central College in Naperville, Illinois, and thePlacer Land Trust’s School Park Community Garden inAuburn, California. Continue reading