NCPIRG wants students to think about the bees this Thanksgiving

by Jerry Jiang, Daily Tar Heel

People become accustomed to the habit of expecting Thanksgiving to simply come along every November, but in the words of North Carolina Public Interest Research Group’s slogan, “No bees, no Thanksgiving.”

State senator Mike Woodard spoke at the Bee-Saving event, hosted by Edible Campus UNC behind Davis Library as part of NCPIRG’s Save the Bees campaign.  Continue reading

Hillsborough to bee hospitable with new hotel

in the Daily Tar Heel

A bee hotel will be all the buzz in Hillsborough, NC, on Saturday, as it is unveiled in efforts to combat the disappearance of bees from local habitats.

“A lot of people are aware of the decline of honey bees in the United States, but fewer people understand the role of native bees,” said Stephanie Trueblood, Hillsborough public space manager.  Continue reading

Xerces Society seeks Pollinator Conservation Specialist / Agronomist

Location: Preference is to locate this position at a home office in Minnesota or North Dakota. For the right candidate, we may consider additional location options.

Start Date: Hiring preference will go to candidates available to start in early to mid-January; some flexibility of start date exists.
The Xerces Society manages the largest and most advanced pollinator conservation program in the world and we offer unparalleled career opportunities for participating in some of the most cutting-edge wildlife conservation happening today. Continue reading

NC State University student spotlight on pollinator protection

In NC State College of Agriculture and Life Sciences News

by Chelsea Kellner, NC State University

As pollinator gardens grow in popularity, Marisol Mata wants to make sure they are giving North Carolina’s native bees the nutrition they need to thrive.

Her work can also help us glimpse the future — how changes in global weather patterns could affect nutrition for one of our smallest but most important eco-partners. Continue reading

Fall Pest Management Seminar in Dallas

From Insects in the City

Registration is now open for the Fall Pest Management Seminar, sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service. This is one of the most convenient and cost-effective ways to get your pesticide applicator CEUs in the Dallas area.  To register, go to our AgriLife Conference Registration site.  Early registration is still only $70, and includes lunch.

One big change this year is our location. This meeting, and all training meetings in the foreseeable future will be held at a new address, the Richardson Civic Center. It’s a very nice facility and no more hard yellow chairs!  We hope you’ll join us and check it out. Continue reading

Upcoming Environmental Modeling Public Meeting on Assessing Exposure and Risk to Pollinators & Plants

On October 18, 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency will hold an Environmental Modeling Public Meeting. This meeting provides a public forum for EPA and its stakeholders to discuss current issues related to modeling pesticide fate, transport, and exposure for pesticide risk assessments in a regulatory context. The focus of this meeting will be on “assessing exposure and risk to pollinators and plants,” and also includes additional modeling and exposure related presentations.

Pollinator presentations will address scientific issues related to managed and unmanaged bees, including colony simulations in a risk assessment context. Plant presentations include a description of a terrestrial and wetland plant exposure model and an evaluation of historical variability in seedling emergence and vegetative vigor control data. Additional modeling/exposure presentations examine a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic pesticide exposure models. Continue reading

Climate’s Effects on Flowers Critical for Bumble Bees

by Mick Kulikowski, NC State University

In a study that shows the importance of climate change on critical pollinators, North Carolina State University researchers found that earlier and longer flowering seasons can have poor effects on the bumble bees that rely on these flowers to live and thrive.

“We wanted to understand how climate change is affecting bee populations – specifically three species of bumble bees that live at higher altitudes and are important pollinators,” said Rebecca Irwin, an NC State professor of applied ecology and co-principal investigator on the study, which is published in the journal Ecology Letters. “We asked whether variation in snowmelt timing and summer precipitation directly affected bumble bee colonies and their survival, or if the snowmelt and precipitation effects on flowers were more important. It turns out that the effects on flowers played a more critical role in affecting bee populations.” Continue reading