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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

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Neonicotinoid Insecticides: Efficacy, Non-target Effects, and Best Management Practices

What will you learn?

Participants will learn about the efficacy and nontarget effects of neonicotinoid seed treatments and management practices that should be considered to minimize adverse impacts on pollinators and other nontarget organisms. Learn more…

Presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology

Continue reading

West Texas bees doubt groundhog’s extended winter prediction

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

SPLAT! West Texas honey bees are on the move, so motorists shouldn’t be surprised if their windshields are strafed by a hapless swarm in coming weeks, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologist.

Dr. Charles Allen, of San Angelo, said the unusually warm February, touted as the warmest on record here, has put honey bees in the mood to travel. Continue reading

Program educates youth on the importance of pollinators to agriculture, daily life

by Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

St. John Berchmans Catholic School students in San Antonio learned about the importance of pollinators at the Feed a Bee Planting Event presented Feb. 27 by Bayer in collaboration with National 4-H and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Bexar County.

The event kicked off Bayer’s 12th annual AgVocacy Forum, which this year takes place from Feb. 28 through March 1 in San Antonio. Continue reading

Japanese scientists create drone to help with pollination

Scientists at Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology are using the mechanics of cross-pollination with bees to create a drone that can pick up pollen in one flower and bring it to another.

The drone, which is controlled manually, is 4 centimeters wide and weighs about 15 grams. The bottom of the drone is covered with a sticky-gel-coated horsehair that picks up pollen from one flower and rubs them off on another flower. The research team has been able to successfully cross-pollinate Japanese lilies with the drone. Continue reading

Registration open for Ohio River Valley Woodlands and Wildlife Workshop

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

The Ohio River Valley Woodlands and Wildlife Workshop returns to Kentucky on March 25.

This year’s workshop, a tri-state event covering Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio, will be held in the Boone County Cooperative Extension Enrichment Center in Burlington. Forestry experts will provide an array of forestry- and wildlife-related educational sessions to help woodland owners get the most from their properties. Continue reading

Pollination Ecologist position University of Florida

The Entomology and Nematology Department at the University of Florida is accepting applications for an Assistant Professorship focused on pollination ecology in natural areas and crop systems. This is a 12-month, tenure-accruing position that will be 60% research (Florida Agricultural Experiment Station), 25% Extension (UF/IFAS Extension Service), and 15% teaching (College of Agricultural and Life Sciences). The position is based in Gainesville, FL, USA. The primary focus within the research assignment is the pollination ecology and/or conservation of non-Apis bees. The Extension responsibilities will include developing and implementing an effective statewide Extension education program to support conservation efforts and stakeholders who rely on the pollination services that non-Apis bees provide. The teaching responsibilities will include developing an undergraduate/graduate course in pollinator ecology/conservation and participation in revolving topic seminars in the candidate’s area of expertise. 

More information about the position can be found at http://explore.jobs.ufl.edu/cw/en-us/job/501323. The University of Florida is an Equal Opportunity Institution.    

Funding opportunities for pollinator health projects

Here are several funding opportunities that support pollinator health research, educational and extension projects in 2017: Continue reading