Soybean leaf yellowing and curling widespread across Southeast

In Southeast Farm Press

By Dominic Reisig, North Carolina Extension Entomologist

Reports have been pouring in on a mysterious symptom seen across fields in North Carolina.  Oddly, these symptoms are widespread across the Southeast (including North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia), are only present in certain varieties, affect nearly every plant in the field, and are field-specific (one field will be completely affected, while a neighboring field of a different variety will be spared).

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What’s eating my maple trees?

With their bright red or yellow leaves glowing during this time of year, maple trees are one of the most impressive trees in fall. In most Southern states, they are native, whether they are red, Norway, (Norway is a non-native, invasive tree) Freeman or silver. In the northern states, sugar maples provide us with rich maple syrup for pancakes and waffles. But their beauty and usefulness don’t make them immune from serving as lunch to many insect pests, so if you find that the leaves on some of your maple trees are disappearing rather than winding up on the ground, below is a list of some of the most common insect pests of maples.

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Drought creates different insect problems

By Katie Pratt

LEXINGTON, Ky., (July 6, 2012) – Hot, dry weather could have some insects feeding in greater-than-normal numbers on crops like alfalfa, tobacco and some vegetables.

“Alfalfa, with its long tap root, will stay greener and more succulent during a drought than pasture grasses or field crops,” said Lee Townsend, extension entomologist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. “That makes alfalfa attractive to most any insect that can use it, even if the bug normally doesn’t eat alfalfa. Also, irrigated tobacco and vegetables will be very attractive to insects like grasshoppers and stink bugs under these dry conditions.”

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