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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Webinar – Bed Bugs: Considerations for Healthcare Providers

Bed bugs can infest just about anywhere. There are unique considerations to be mindful of as healthcare providers and social service professionals address their clients’ health concerns while providing a safe and healthy living environment.

Tuesday, October 23, 2018 | 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. ET

Followed by a live Q&A session 3:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Register now Continue reading

Bed Bug Histamines Are Substantial, Persistent in Infested Homes

From NC State News

New research findings could turn perceptions of the already despised bed bug from nuisance pest into medically important threat. A study from North Carolina State University shows that histamine levels are substantially higher in homes infested by bed bugs than in pest-free homes, and that these histamine levels persist for months – even if the bed bugs have been eliminated from the home.

NC State post-doctoral researcher Zachary DeVries and colleagues from NC State and the N.C. Dept. of Health and Human Services conducted a Raleigh-based study to compare histamine levels in homes with and without bed bug infestation. The researchers also evaluated the extent to which treatment and time affect those histamine levels. Continue reading

FDA approves first U.S. treatment for Chagas disease

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced yesterday that it has granted accelerated approval for the nation’s first treatment for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi spread by kissing bugs that has increasingly been found in the United States, especially in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley area.

The drug benznidazole, made by Chemo Research, SL, of Madrid, is approved for use in children ages 2 to 12 years old who have Chagas disease. Its safety and efficacy were shown in two placebo-controlled clinical trials in children 6 to 12 years old. An additional study in kids ages 2 to 12 helped set dosing recommendations. Stomach pain, rash, decreased weight, and headache were among the most common adverse reactions, and the drug was associated with some serious risks, including skin reactions, nervous system effects, and bone marrow depression.  Continue reading

Methods and Guidance for Testing the Efficacy of Antimicrobials against Biofilm Bacteria on Hard, Non-Porous Surfaces

The Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the availability of two test methods (MB-19 and MB-20) for evaluating the efficacy of antimicrobial pesticides against two biofilm bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as regulatory guidance for pesticidal claims for those products. These test methods and guidance provide a framework for registrants who seek to make a claim for antimicrobial pesticide products to control these bacteria on hard, non-porous surfaces.

Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, the registrant of an antimicrobial product with a public health claim is required to submit efficacy data to EPA in support of the product’s registration.   Continue reading

Zika Risk in Texas Rises with Temperatures

As the state prepares for additional local transmission of the Zika virus during the 2017 mosquito season, the Texas Department of State Health Services is expanding its testing guidance for residents of six South Texas counties.

DSHS Monday issued a health alert that now recommends testing all pregnant residents of Cameron, Hidalgo, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata counties in both the first and second trimesters of pregnancy and any resident who has a rash plus at least one other common Zika symptom: fever, joint pain or eye redness. Continue reading

2017 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series: Mosquitoes and Insect Borne Diseases

In this webinar, Dr. Derrick Mathias, Assistant Professor, Auburn University will discuss medically important mosquitoes and mosquito-borne viruses endemic to and threatening the Southeast. Learn about mosquito ecology, virus transmission, signs and symptoms of mosquito borne illnesses and how to assess your risk of infection.  Moderated by Ellen Huckabay and Lucy Edwards, Regional Extension Agents, Alabama Extension. Click here to login as a guest and participate in the live event.   Note: on April 7th, the link to the live webinar opens about 15 minutes before the webinar. If you try to log in earlier, you will get an error message.

When: Friday, April 7 at 2:00 pm EDT Continue reading

AgriLife Research team makes strides in fight against Zika

There’s a war raging on a tiny battlefield and the outcome could well touch millions of people worldwide threatened by Zika and related viruses. The key ally unlocking the mystery surrounding this conflict is the long-dreaded yellow fever virus.

Dr. Kevin Myles, Glady “Hazitha” Samuel and Dr. Zach Adelman are Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists at Texas A&M University, College Station, who published “Yellow fever virus capsid protein is a potent suppressor of RNA silencing that binds double-stranded RNA.”

The paper appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Go to http://bit.ly/2eYsyIQ. Continue reading