Extension demo plot shows most economic management tool during heavy fall armyworm year

In Delta Farm Press

by Mary Hightower, University of Arkansas

Fall armyworms don’t bother with calendars. They’re here, they’re hungry and – never mind that it’s mid-summer — they’re in their second generation.

However, they can be managed, and that’s what Kelly Loftin, Extension entomologist, and Hank Chaney, regional agricultural and natural resources specialist, have been working with Steven Stone, Lincoln County Extension staff chair, all with the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, have been eager to show in a pasture outside of Star City in southeastern Arkansas. Continue reading

EPA Registers New Insecticide Alternative to Neonicotinoids, Safer for Bees

The EPA is registering a new insecticide, flupyradifurone, that is safer for bees. It is expected to be an alternative to more toxic products including certain pyrethroid, neonicotinoid, organophosphate and avermectin insecticides.

As an insecticide, flupyradifurone is unusual in that laboratory-based studies indicate that the compound is practically non-toxic to adult honeybees. Studies show no adverse effect on overall bee colony performance or overwintering ability when compared to untreated colonies.

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North Carolina farmers should consider treatment options for plant bugs

In Southeast Farm Press

Cotton squaring and flowering is a few weeks away, and now is a good time for North Carolina farmers to think about treatment options for plant bugs, according to North Carolina State University Extension entomologist Dr.  Dominic Reisig.

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Fire Ant Control: The Two-Step Method and Other Approaches

From School Pest News, Texas A&M AgriLife

When it comes to insect pests, fire ants would probably top everyone’s list! Red and black imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri) are invasive species and their painful bites can injure or kill livestock, wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. Their large mounds (as many as 300 per acre) are unsightly and often damage mowers and other equipment. Fire ants also infest buildings and can damage electrical equipment by chewing on wire insulation.

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New insects keep life interesting, says Auburn entomologist

After 41 years in the business, one might think that an entomologist would run out of new things to talk about.

Not so, says Ron Smith, long-time Auburn University Extension entomologist, who says there’s always something new and different in the world of crop insects.

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