Researchers have discovered a fungus deadly to snakes

One of the first hints that yet another fungal disease that could devastate wildlife was emerging in the United States came in 2006 with a report that an isolated winter den of timber rattlesnakes in New Hampshire had suffered a population crash.

Those snakes were on the far northern edge of their species’ habitat, and showed signs they had suffered from inbreeding. But they also had skin lesions, often called hibernation blisters or hibernation sores, that caught the attention of scientists. Continue reading

Georgia crop consultant gets bitten by snakes in soybean field

From Southeast Farm Press

Kevin Cotton never heard the snakes in the soybean field.

The first one bit him and he knew it was bad. He quickly stepped a few feet away and that’s where the other one hit him. Two rattlesnakes bit him within seconds of each other.

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