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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Do red imported fire ants have any redeeming qualities?

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

Red imported fire ants have earned a justifiably bad rap across the south and most Texans would be hard put to name a single redeeming quality the ants have.

But a team of Texas A&M scientists and a colleague from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge have published a manuscript offering a glimmer of redemption for the invaders. The paper, “Decreased small mammal and on-host tick abundance in association with invasive red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta,” was published in the scientific journal Royal Society Biology Letters on Sept. 21. The work and list of collaborators are available at http://bit.ly/2cDdgWy. Continue reading

More fire ants are coming, says NC State entomologist

In Coastal Review Online

by

The impossible-to-eradicate, imported red fire ant is going to expand farther and crop up in higher concentrations in North Carolina.

This is primarily due to the fact that one type of social colony of these wildly unpopular insects, known for their painful sting and costly impact to the state’s nursery industry, is killing off another, according to Charles Apperson, a professor of entomology at N.C. State University’s Department of Entomology.

There are two types of fire ant social colonies – monogyne, single-queen colonies, and polygyne, multiple-queen colonies. It’s the polygyne colonies that have the upper hand, destroying single-queen colonies one mound at a time. Continue reading

Tawny crazy ant becoming a major pest in some states

This article, written by Dr. Danny McDonald at Sam Houston State University, appeared in PestWorld in July.

By now you have probably heard of a new invasive ant species that is terrorizing the Gulf Coast states.  There are tales of these ants shorting out electrical equipment, invading people’s homes in extraordinary numbers, and displacing the infamous Red Imported Fire Ant (Solenopsis invicta) with ease. This pest is the tawny crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva (also known as the Caribbean crazy ant, hairy crazy ant, and Rasberry crazy ant). It is difficult to explain to those that have not witnessed an infestation firsthand just how dense the populations of crazy ants can be. Under every stone, foraging up every tree, and crawling over every blade of grass, the tawny crazy ant is ubiquitous throughout the landscape in neighborhoods from Florida to Texas. It is not an exaggeration to describe their populations as biblical plague-like proportions.

Read the rest of the story.