A Tree’s Life: Easy Citizen Science for Healthier Trees

by Dee Shore, NC State University

Red maple trees have important jobs to do – and so could you, if you happen to have one in your yard and just a few minutes to spare each year.

Through a new project called A Tree’s Life, NC State University researchers hope to recruit 250 people to help them learn more about how trees grow in cities compared to rural areas and suburbs. Continue reading

Have a red maple? Become a citizen scientist!

If you have a red maple (Acer rubrum) in your yard, and a few minutes of free time per year we would like your help in monitoring tree growth for A Tree’s Life, a citizen-science project.

Trees provide a suite of ecosystem services that improve human and environmental health. However, urban trees are subject to environmental stressors, including increased temperatures and drought, which reduce these services and make tree more susceptible to arthropod pests. The objectives of A Tree’s Life are to understand how climate and urbanization affect tree pests, growth, and health, and thus ecological services like carbon sequestration and air and water filtration. This project was recently funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s Southern IPM Center in Raleigh, North Carolina. Continue reading

NC State doctoral student wins Friends of Southern IPM Award for work on urban heat islands

A doctoral student at NC State University will receive a regional award in November for his work on urban tree integrated pest management.

NCSU Ph.D. student, Adam Dale, was one of several graduate students nominated to receive a Friends of Southern IPM Graduate Student award. The Southern IPM Center, which sponsors the award, gives one Masters award and one Ph.D. award based on the decision of an outside panel.

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