Scientists seek public assistance in tackling rose rosette disease

by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife

Halfway through a five-year, $4.6 million grant to combat rose rosette disease in the U.S., the national research team studying it is encouraged by the amount of information learned but admits having a way to go before finding how to overcome the deadly problem.

Rose rosette was observed on wild roses as early as the 1940s, but it was not until 2011 that scientists definitively identified the cause as being from a new virus in the novel genus Emaravirus transmitted by the microscopic eriophyid mite, according to Dr. David Byrne. Now the virus is killing commercial rose varieties. Continue reading

Disease affecting Kentucky roses

Roses are popular garden plants because of their beauty and pleasant aroma, but a new disease is affecting roses and threatening to change the landscape of many Kentucky gardens, said Nicole Ward Gauthier, extension plant pathologist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

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