IPM keeps food on our table–at a price we can afford

I read a blog article today written by one of the Southwest Farm Press editors, resolving to eat more doughnuts in 2018. The editor, Shelley Huguley, discussed how one of America’s favorite treats was in jeopardy because of a pest insect that attacks sugarcane, the sugarcane borer. Although I didn’t come up with the idea to discuss the idea of pest management in terms of the products that we love, I know a great idea when I see one, so I decided to take her idea and run with it to talk about our own contributions to America’s products.

Keeping products in our homes is just one of the benefits for good pest management. With so many insects and diseases that can adapt to a single pest management technique, such as a particular pesticide, scientists have to get creative to make sure farmers and others who need to manage pests can do it at a cost that won’t break America’s banks. Continue reading

What’s eating my maple trees?

With their bright red or yellow leaves glowing during this time of year, maple trees are one of the most impressive trees in fall. In most Southern states, they are native, whether they are red, Norway, (Norway is a non-native, invasive tree) Freeman or silver. In the northern states, sugar maples provide us with rich maple syrup for pancakes and waffles. But their beauty and usefulness don’t make them immune from serving as lunch to many insect pests, so if you find that the leaves on some of your maple trees are disappearing rather than winding up on the ground, below is a list of some of the most common insect pests of maples.

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