Soybean cyst nematode resistant soybeans help with control–but only with rotation

In Delta Farm Press

New University of Missouri Extension plant pathologist Kaitlyn Bissonnette brings research on soybean cyst nematode (SCN) management to Missouri.

SCN numbers are growing in Missouri as farmers devote more acres to soybean production. SCN infests about 75 percent of Missouri fields, according to a recent survey by MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources researcher Melissa Mitchum. Many of these fields have high SCN egg counts. Continue reading

Aphid infestation increases chance of soybean cyst nematode

In Southeast Farm Press

According to a recent soy-checkoff-funded study, the presence of soybean aphids in a soybean field increases the chances that the same field will be infested with soybean cyst nematode – even in fields planted to SCN-resistant varieties.

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Four ways to handle Southern root-knot nematode

From Southeast Farm Press

Southern root-knot nematode is causing problems in the Southeast, according to John Mueller, a Clemson University professor. Root-knot nematodes can cause severe reduction in soybean yield, worsen injury caused by other fungal diseases and cause plant death.

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If you had SDS in soybeans, sample for SCN

The University of Tennessee crops blog suggests that soybean farmers who experienced Sudden Death Syndrome on their crop sample for soybean cyst nematode. The blog post discusses the link between the two diseases. Read the post.

If you are in another state, call your extension specialist who works on soybeans.

Soybean cyst nematode may be reason for ‘yield ceiling’ in Kentucky

In Southeast Farm Press

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is the most widespread and damaging disease pest of the crop in Kentucky.

It is my opinion that SCN is the main cause of the so-called, “yield ceiling” that is evident in many Kentucky soybean fields.

SCN is managed by rotating fields to non-host crops, such as corn, and by planting soybean cultivars that resist SCN. The problem is that in order for these tactics to be used properly, their effectiveness must be monitored over time.

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6 Reasons to Sample for SCN this Fall

I took this article from Corn and Soybean Digest. Since soybean cyst nematode is prevalent in the South, I thought it would apply to a lot of our farmers. Ohio State University submitted the original article.

While it is still fresh in your mind, many of you probably noticed the great deal of variability this year in yields that occurred as you were driving the combine across the field. Part of the variability is due to the presence of soybean cyst nematode (SCN). Why is it important to know where it is and what the levels are? Here are a few reasons.

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