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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Neonicotinoid Insecticides: Efficacy, Non-target Effects, and Best Management Practices

What will you learn?

Participants will learn about the efficacy and nontarget effects of neonicotinoid seed treatments and management practices that should be considered to minimize adverse impacts on pollinators and other nontarget organisms. Learn more…

Presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology

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Thrips resistance in cotton

In Southeast Farm Press

by Ron Smith, Alabama Cooperative Extension System

The first major insect we focus on during the cotton production season is thrips. Many have heard and read in recent years about the resistance of thrips to our available seed treatments.

We already recommend foliar sprays at the one to two true-leaf stage when cotton seedlings are not growing rapidly and/or thrips pressure is extremely heavy. As the resistance problem grows, we likely will see an increased need for foliar sprays on top of the seed treatments. Continue reading

EPA Finds Neonicotinoid Seed Treatments of Little or No Benefit to U.S. Soybean Production

On October 16, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released an analysis of the benefits of neonicotinoid seed treatments for insect control in soybeans.  A Federal Register notice inviting the public to comment on the analysis will publish in the near future.

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Loss of seed treatments could increase use of insecticides

From Delta Farm Press

Environmental groups appear to be setting their sights on the neonicotinoid class of insecticides and other pesticide compounds as the main culprits in honey bee population declines.

The evidence the insecticides are the main cause is sketchy, and the loss of those would put many farmers in an unprofitable situation, according to Jeff Gore, research entomologist at Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center.

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Controlling corn insects in 2013

Most corn insect control decisions are made before the planter hits the field. “Of course, decisions to control stalk borers in non-Bt corn, as well as cutworms and stink bugs in all corn, are made in-season,” says Auburn University entomologist Kathy Flanders.

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