Interest in no-till is increasing in Texas

in Southwest Farm Press

by Ron Smith, Southwest Farm Press

Texas cotton farmers are beginning to show more interest in no-till production, says Bobbie McMichael, and he advises that keeping residue on fields will improve soil health.

The Texas Tech University biology professor, speaking at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in Dallas, said residue from cover crops and from previous plantings with no-till and reduced tillage systems, offers numerous benefits to the soil, including reducing water runoff, improving infiltration, and limiting soil erosion. It also benefits the soil and crop in a less visible way, improving microbial activity, especially fungi, which he says are more beneficial to soil and plant health than bacteria.

Read the rest of the story in Southwest Farm Press.

Using Adaptive Grazing to Improve Soil Health in Grazing Ecosystems

What will you learn?

This webinar will teach strategies for improving soil function on range and pastures, including an emphasis on management of livestock like large migratory herds in natural systems for proper herd impact and increased nutrient and water cycling in grass ecosystems. Learn more…

Jan 10, 2017 2:00 pm US/Eastern

Presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology Continue reading

Now is the time to plan your spring garden

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

December is the time to plan and prepare for spring gardens, said Dr. Joe Masabni, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service small-acreage vegetable specialist, Overton.

East Texas spring gardens are finished producing and the fall garden should be in full swing, he said. So in down months like December, it’s best to get organized and ready for spring planting. Continue reading

Cover crop, soil health conference in Arkansas Dec. 13-14

In Delta Farm Press

Farmers from Arkansas and surrounding states will attend the Southern Agricultural Cover Crops, Soil Health and Water Management Conference Dec. 13-14 being held at the Arkansas State University Convocation Center in Jonesboro, Ark.

The conference, co-sponsored by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Arkansas Association of Conservation Districts, is designed to help farmers learn how to successfully adopt a cover crop management system and improve soil health and water management on their operations. Continue reading

Weed Control & Soil Health Go Hand-in-Hand

by South Dakota State University

Although many landowners may not give much thought to weed control as a soil health measure, Gared Shaffer, SDSU Extension Weeds Field Specialist said the two go hand-in-hand.

“The same management practices which increase soil health, like planting cover crops or a diverse cash crop rotation, also can be deterrent to weeds,” Shaffer explained. With the rise of herbicide resistant weeds not just on the horizon but in your fields, farmers want answers. Most have turned to a new herbicide in the past. Continue reading

Buckwheat is a good cover crop for the home garden

By Josh Fuder, University of Georgia

Buckwheat adds nitrogen to garden plots, produces beautiful flowers and delicious pancakes.

Each year I start my garden with grand visions of endless bounty. Something happens around the first part of July, though. Continue reading

Tennessee field day on no-till reports research results

The 29th Milan No-Till Field Day tour, sponsored by the University of Tennessee, summarizes outcomes from a year of research in a report available on the web. You can find the report here. Below is the table of contents from the report: Continue reading