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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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J.C. Raulston Arboretum hosts conference on sustainable landscaping

by Dee Shore, NC State University

Sustainable landscaping not only benefits the environment, it creates new opportunities for landscape  and green industry professionals. These opportunities are the focus of a new summer conference on sustainable landscaping practices at the JC Raulston Arboretum. Continue reading

Evaluating soil health

The Soil Health Institute (SHI), which is charged with safeguarding and enhancing the vitality and productivity of soil through scientific research and advancement, has released the initial methods cooperating scientists will use to assess soil health indicators as they move toward standardization of soil health measurements.

According to Dr. Steven Shafer, Chief Scientific Officer of SHI, the lack of widely-applicable measurements and methods for assessing soil health are significant barriers to adopting soil health practices and systems. Continue reading

Pollinators are important to water and soil conservation

In Southwest Farm Press

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Association of Texas Soil and Water Conservation Districts, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, and Texas Wildlife Association are joining other state agencies and organizations in a statewide campaign to highlight the importance of voluntary land stewardship in Texas. Soil and Water Stewardship Week is April 29 through May 6, 2018, and the focus this year is “The Importance of Pollinators to Soil and Water Conservation in Texas.”

Pollinators include the birds and the bees (butterflies, bats, beetles, moths, and even small mammals) and are vital for production agriculture, our food supply, and the preservation of our natural resources. Many Texas farmers, ranchers, foresters, and urbanites recognize the importance of these insects and animals, and are attempting to regenerate pollinator populations by implementing voluntary conservation practices on private and public lands. Texans have been working with their local Soil and Water Conservation Districts (SWCDs) for over 75 years to voluntarily implement conservation practices that protect and enhance our soil and water resources.  Continue reading

Now Available: 2017 National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health Presentations

Videos and presentations from the 2017 National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health sessions are now available. Held December 7-8, 2017 in Indianapolis, the conference highlighted insights from some of the nation’s most innovative producers, conservation leaders and scientists on using cover crops to improve soil health. Continue reading

Root chemicals can affect soil health

From the American Society of Agronomy

As the growing season progresses, you might not notice much about what’s happening to plants under the soil. Most of us pay attention to new shoots, stems, leaves, and eventually the flowers and crop we intend to grow. We might think of roots as necessary, but uninteresting, parts of the crop production process.

Paul Hallett and his team disagree. They focus on what’s going on in the soil with the plant’s roots. Continue reading

Find Indicators of Soil Health in New Video

The National Center for Appropriate Technology’s short video, Soil Aggregate Stability: Visual Indicators of Soil Health, shows the dramatic differences in aggregate stability that result from different management practices of the exact same soil type. The narration by NCAT California Regional Office Director Rex Dufour explains why aggregate stability is so important as an indicator of soil health, and how soil health can be supported.

View it for free at the NCAT YouTube page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=giDduFw1Ybo.

The video is also available in Spanish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVgpVIm6bE8&feature=youtu.be.

 

Soil Microbes Every Agronomist Should Know

This webinar is sponsored by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology, National Technology Support Centers

What will you learn?

This webinar will focus on the challenges and benefits of managing soil biology rather than relying only on chemically based systems, along with the key roles that soil microbes play in agroecosystems. Learn more… Continue reading