Soil Microbes Every Agronomist Should Know

This webinar is sponsored by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology, National Technology Support Centers

What will you learn?

This webinar will focus on the challenges and benefits of managing soil biology rather than relying only on chemically based systems, along with the key roles that soil microbes play in agroecosystems. Learn more… Continue reading

UGA Extension pecan specialist believes cover crops are valuable additions to pecan orchards

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells recommends planting crimson clover, or a similar cover crop, in pecan orchards to supply much-needed nitrogen and build up organic matter in the soil.

Whether used in fields where row crops are produced or planted in home gardens, cover crops are most often planted during the fall. They provide nutrients that will benefit the soil profile later. Cover crops may be particularly beneficial in pecan production. Continue reading

Are You Interested in Cover Crops and Soil Health?

Pre-registration is ending next week for the Second National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health, being held December 7-8 in Indianapolis, IN. The pre-registration deadline is Tuesday, November 7th. 

After November 7th, the conference registration price goes from $150 to $200 for ag professionals (including university, agency, NGO and agribusiness staff). The farmer pre-registration fee is $90 and student fee is $50. Each of those will increase by $25 after November 7th. Continue reading

Conference on cover crops and soil health

Pre-registration is ending next week for the Second National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health, being held December 7-8 in Indianapolis, IN.  The pre-registration deadline is Tuesday, November 7th. 

After November 7th, the conference registration price goes from $150 to $200 for ag professionals (including university, agency, NGO and agribusiness staff).  The farmer pre-registration fee is $90 and student fee is $50.  Each of those will increase by $25 after November 7th. Continue reading

Corn growers and environmental advocate find ways to work together

In Delta Farm Press

The idea that the National Corn Growers Association would fall in line with the Environmental Defense Fund views seems far-fetched. However, when it comes to soil health, Chris Novak says the two organizations have a common purpose.

Novak, CEO of the National Corn Growers Association, says the time has come for farmers and ranchers to have open dialogues with environmental advocates regarding climate change, soil health and sustainability. “We can fight things out in the courts, we can fight things out in Congress — or we can buckle down, sit down at the table together and talk together about the opportunity for voluntary solution, and we can make real progress for our land and farms at the same time,” he says. Continue reading

Soil health is the key to good spinach plants

in Morning Ag Clips

Soils keep plants healthy by providing plants with water, helpful minerals, and microbes, among other benefits. But what if the soil also contains toxic elements?

In areas like Salinas Valley, California, the soils are naturally rich in the element cadmium. Leafy vegetables grown in these soils can take up the cadmium and become harmful to humans. What to do? The solution goes back to the soil. Adrian Paul, a former researcher now working in the Sustainable Mineral Institute in Brisbane, Australia, is working to find which soil additives work best. Continue reading

New technology helps analyze soil

In Morning Ag Clips

Farmers and gardeners know their soil texture can make a big difference in their success. Different plants have different needs for water, nutrients, and air. When they grow in soil that has the right texture, it is easier to deliver the right amount of water, fertilizer, or pesticide to the plants. Then they grow better.

Traditional ways of analyzing soil texture are slow. Danish researchers have shown a new, high-tech method that is fast, cost-effective, and portable. This technique could make it much easier to understand the soil texture of a particular area–or even large areas across the globe. Continue reading