Telling the difference between Southern versus common rust in corn

In Delta Farm Press

According to Travis Faske, Extension plant pathologist with the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, growers can tell the difference between Southern corn rust and common rust by the colors of the pustules.

Orange pustules, the University of Tennessee’s jersey colors, are more likely to be symptoms of Southern corn rust. University of Arkansas Razorback red pustules most likely belong to common rust. Continue reading

Marty Draper is appointed as head of KSU plant pathology department

Former USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture program leader Marty Draper is now the head of the plant pathology department at Kansas State University.

“I am excited to be getting back to the university setting, being able to work with producers, and trying to help the department become better than it already is,” Draper said in an interview with Grainnet. Continue reading

Southern rust and tar spot of corn are on the move

In Southeast Farm Press

by Carl Bradley, University of Kentucky Extension Plant Pathologist

Two corn diseases are already making some news this season. Southern rust and tar spot have been detected in southern states and could potentially make their way to Kentucky this season. So, keeping a lookout for these two diseases is a good idea. Continue reading

El Nino may mean more diseases in corn due to delayed planting

In Southeast Farm Press

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

El Nino weather pattern will likely interfere with Georgia corn planting in March. A delay would increase the likelihood of diseases, too. Growers are advised to plant resistant varieties and be ready to apply fungicides earlier than normal.

A wet winter has already saturated Georgia’s soils, and more wet and cool conditions are expected through the first part of spring, according to UGA agricultural climatologist Pam Knox. “The rains associated with passing storms will keep soils wet for the foreseeable future,” she said. Continue reading

Southern rust confirmed in Virginia corn

In Southeast Farm Press

Southern rust was confirmed Aug. 3 on corn samples from Chesapeake and Suffolk in Virginia, according to a blog posting by Hillary Mehl, assistant professor of plant pathology at the Virginia Tech Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Suffolk.

Continue reading

Southern corn rust infestations higher in North Carolina this year

From Southeast Farm Press

A combination of wet weather in early July and cooler than normal temperatures in the middle of the month has worked to increase the level of Southern corn rust in North Carolina.

The disease was reported in mid-July in in at least 10 North Carolina counties – Beaufort, Craven, Greene, Hyde, Jones, Lenoir, Pamlico, Tyrrell, Wayne and Wilson.

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Southern corn rust found in eastern North Carolina

From Southeast Farm Press

Southern Corn Rust has been found in Lenoir and Wayne counties in eastern North Carolina and farmers need to scout their fields and be prepared to make a fungicide application, according to researchers at North Carolina State University.

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Georgia growers learn some lessons about crop diseases this year

By Robert C. Kemerait, UGA Cooperative Extension

Weather conditions played a big role in the types of diseases that were found on Georgia crops in 2013.

Rainfall delayed harvest for some cotton and soybean growers and brought diseases to peanuts, cotton and corn.

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Southern rust found in Kentucky corn

In Southeast Farm Press

by Paul Vincelli, UK Extension

Southern rust was confirmed the first week of August on corn in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

Based on photos from an industry representative, it also appears to be present in Logan County (lab confirmation pending).  The disease has been developing in southern Georgia and Mississippi throughout July, and it also has been detected recently in Nebraska, Arkansas, Kansas and Illinois. I suspect that southern rust is at low levels in several locations in Kentucky, although scouting thus far suggests it is not yet widely prevalent. In other words, there is no need for “panic.” Just need watchful eyes.

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Frequent rain making disease control difficult in Georgia crops

In Southeast Farm Press

By Robert C. Kemerait, UGA Cooperative Extension

Rain may be a good thing, but too much can become a problem for Georgia growers when it comes to disease control.

The torrential rains Georgia has experienced in recent weeks have created perfect conditions for fungal and bacterial diseases on peanuts, cotton, corn and soybeans.

Continue reading