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Be on the alert for fall armyworms this fall

From Insects in the City

Pest management professionals who care for lawns should be on the alert for fall armyworms this fall. Higher-than-normal populations of this lawn-eating insect have been reported from many areas in Texas these past two weeks.

While fall armyworms are nothing new, according to Dr. Allen Knutson, extension agricultural entomologist in Dallas, this year they are a widespread problem for hay producers and small grains producers across the state.  “I’ve had calls as far west as Wichita Falls, south to Comanche and across east Texas,” he said.  Locally in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, my turfgrass colleague, Dr. Lindsey Hoffman, and I have gotten many calls this week from concerned lawn owners, schools and the media. Continue reading

New biopesticide available for bollworms and budworms

A host-specific virus is being used to control bollworms and budworms in Arkansas crops.

Helicoverpa nucleopolyhedrovirus, or just NPV, does not affect humans, plants or other insects, including those that are beneficial. Continue reading

Combination of tactics important to control nematodes

In Southeast Farm Press

Both Clemson University and North Carolina State University are issuing warning bells for nematodes in the Carolinas.

The nematode issue was front in center at both Clemson’s corn and soybean production meeting in Dillon, S.C., Feb. 8 and at N.C. State’s Road Show production meeting the following day in Plymouth, N.C. A concern in both states is the Southern root knot nematode and the soybean cyst nematode. Continue reading

Soybean growers should watch for late season defoliators

In Delta Farm Press

by Sebe Brown and David Kerns, LSU AgCenter Entomologists

As Louisiana soybeans progress into late summer, producers and consultants should be wary of late-season defoliators such as soybean loopers, velvet bean caterpillars and lingering populations of corn earworms.

Soybean loopers have the ability to build large populations quickly and are exaggerated by the use of broad-spectrum insecticides for three-cornered alfalfa hoppers and stink bugs.

Continue reading

Texas scientists find that redbanded stink bug is a serious threat

Entomologists in Texas got a whiff of a new stink bug doing economic damage to soybeans in Texas and are developing ways to help farmers combat it, according to a report in the journal Environmental Entomology.

Various types of stink bugs have long been a problem on soybean crops, but when sweeps of fields in southeast Texas netted 65 percent redbanded stink bugs, entomologists realized this particular bug had become the predominant pest problem, according to Dr. Mo Way, an entomologist at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Beaumont.

Continue reading

Redbanded stink bug is major soybean pest in Louisiana

In Delta Farm Press

LSU AgCenter researchers are looking at different aspects of the redbanded stink bug. Changes in the state’s climate seem to be causing changes in the population of this insect in Louisiana, LSU entomologist Jeff Davis said.

“Redbanded stink bug is still our major stink bug pest and has been for the past 15 years,” Davis said. “But last year throughout the state there were very low populations.”

Continue reading

Worms reported in early season North Carolina soybeans

In Southeast Farm Press

There are reports of worms in early season soybeans in North Carolina, but at this point density levels aren’t a concern, according to North Carolina Extension entomologist Dominic Reisig.

After sampling numerous fields, Reisig says there are spots where corn earworm and tobacco budworm are present. In a blog posting, Reisig explained that identification is the first step if worms are present in your soybeans.

Continue reading