Wondering what has been going on with your juniper and cypress trees?

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Juniper and cypress varieties hit hard by blight

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Dry summer leads to heavy spider mite damage in non-irrigated peanuts

An abnormally dry and typically hot August provided the perfect conditions for heavy spider mite damage in Georgia’s non-irrigated peanuts.

“This has been an incredibly heavy (year for insects and mites). I’ve had people tell me I may never see another one like this in my career,” said University of Georgia entomologist Mark Abney.

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Browning of cedar trees in Central Texas likely due to budworm

If you live in South Central Texas and have noticed cedar trees turning brown, it is likely due to a new infestation of juniper budworms, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologist.

“Many people in this area have noticed their Ashe juniper trees, commonly called cedar, turning brown,” said Wizzie Brown, AgriLife Extension integrated pest management program specialist for Travis County. “This most likely is being caused by juniper budworms. There was an outbreak of these insects in this area in 2002, and we have had another outbreak this year.”

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Spider mites in Alabama worst on cotton in 50 years

In Southeast Farm Press

By Paul Hollis

Spider mites are influenced greatly by the weather, with hot, dry summers being perfect for mites. Alabama cotton producers have had the greatest problem with spider mites this year than they’ve had in the last 50 years or so.

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Alabama cotton experiencing insect problems

From Southeast Farm Press

By Ron Smith, Auburn University Extension Entomologist

The most significant insect event in the past week was the report of plant bug tolerance to all labeled or recommended insecticides in the Tennessee Valley of Northern Alabama. Several of our most experienced consultants are reporting that all classes of chemistry are suppressing plant bugs but their presence and damage behind applications are still above threshold levels.

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It’s time to scout peanuts in Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

by Mark Abney, University of Georgia entomologist

Spider mites have been reported on a number of crops including vegetables and cotton since this spring, and as conditions continue to be hot and dry in many locations, we are beginning to see populations jump in peanut.

The two spotted spider mite is a challenging pest to control. It thrives in hot, dry conditions where it completes development in as little as seven days at 81 F. Female mites can lay up to 100 eggs over several weeks, so it is easy to see how infestations can go from light to heavy in a very short period of time.

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Consultant survey paints North Carolina’s 2013 cotton insect picture

From Southeast Farm Press

By Jack Bacheler, North Carolina Extension Entomologist

Information from North Carolina’s licensed independent crop consultants is invaluable in determining cotton pest status and insecticide inputs from region to region and from one year to the next.

Their responses to our survey questionnaire are both an accurate account of the past “insect year” and represent approximately one third of North Carolina’s total cotton acreage.

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Insect Control focus in late cotton in Mid-South

In Delta Farm Press

The 2013 Mid-South cotton crop is late.

July 4 in the Mid-South is traditionally a time when yellow blooms formally announce the up and coming cotton crop. For this season however, Independence Day blooms were few and far between, signaling both the lateness of the crop and a big shift from cotton to grain this spring.

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Plant bug levels picking up for some North Carolina cotton growers

From Southeast Farm Press

by Jack Bacheler, NCSU Extension Entomologist

Cotton aphids and spider mites behaving

So far, cotton aphids and spider mites have not tipped their hands, as we have not received reports of economic levels of either pest yet through today (June 28).

A number of folks have reported spider mites, for now at low levels, in many cotton fields.

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