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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Pollinator conference to take place in North Carolina

by Matt Shipman

This autumn, researchers, educators, and industry experts from around the country will descend on a small town in rural North Carolina to discuss a question with repercussions for both the economy and the environment: what can be done to protect bees and other pollinators?

The conference is focused specifically on what can be done to not only conserve but also bolster pollinator populations in so-called “ornamental” landscapes, such as urban areas and manicured gardens. It is the brain child of two entomologists – Steve Frank of NC State University and David Smitley of Michigan State University.

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NC State doctoral student wins Friends of Southern IPM Award for work on urban heat islands

A doctoral student at NC State University will receive a regional award in November for his work on urban tree integrated pest management.

NCSU Ph.D. student, Adam Dale, was one of several graduate students nominated to receive a Friends of Southern IPM Graduate Student award. The Southern IPM Center, which sponsors the award, gives one Masters award and one Ph.D. award based on the decision of an outside panel.

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Study finds urban warming increases scale insect populations and reduces tree health

A study published this past March revealed that urban warming increases the abundance of some tree pests, while decreasing tree health.

North Carolina State University researchers Adam Dale and Steven Frank tested the hypothesis that warm temperatures stimulates the reproduction of herbivorous pests such as armored scale insects (Melanaspis tenebricosa), while also increasing water stress and decreasing tree health. They studied several populations of red maple (Acer rubrum) trees in the city of Raleigh, NC.

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