Cool, wet conditions create good environment for crops, diseases

From Delta Farm Press

This has been one of the coolest summers in recent memory for residents of the South and Southeast. Instead of breaking into a sweat moments after you walk outside, farmers and others who work outdoors have been able to stay reasonably calm, cool and collected.

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Sudden Death Syndrome in Soybean showing up in Tennessee

From the UTCrops News Blog

by Heather Young Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist

Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) has started showing up in soybean fields in Tennessee. The cool, wet season Tennessee has experienced, similar to last season, has been conducive for the disease to develop in susceptible varieties.

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Iowa research show glyphosate not linked to Sudden Death Syndrome

By the Iowa Soybean Association

The world’s most widely used weed killer is not responsible for perpetuating Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) in soybeans, research shows.

A collaborative effort among soybean researchers in the United States and Canada and found that glyphosate does not increase SDS severity or adversely affect yields in soybean fields. Scientists from five Midwest universities and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs, led by Daren Mueller of Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames, participated in the three-year study. Yuba Kandel of ISU analyzed the data.

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If you had SDS in soybeans, sample for SCN

The University of Tennessee crops blog suggests that soybean farmers who experienced Sudden Death Syndrome on their crop sample for soybean cyst nematode. The blog post discusses the link between the two diseases. Read the post.

If you are in another state, call your extension specialist who works on soybeans.

Soybean sudden death syndrome worse than expected

In Southeast Farm Press

By Don Hershman, UK Extension Plant Pathologist

Soybean sudden death syndrome caused by the soil-borne, root-rotting fungus, Fusarium virguliforme, is evident in soybean fields across Kentucky. I have come to realize that the disease is causing more damage than I had initially thought. This is unusual.

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