Postdoctoral Researcher Microbial Control of Sweet Potato Weevil

This is a grant-funded, non-tenure track position. Funding must be available for any continuation of appointment

WORK LOCATION: Department of Entomology, LSU AgCenter, Baton Rouge, La.

RESPONSIBILITIES: Funding is currently available for a postdoctoral researcher in the area of sweet potato weevil biology and control. The successful applicant will conduct research at the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center Department of Entomology in partnership with AgBiome, Inc. as part of a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation funded project. The overall objective is to “develop a microbial solution for deployment to smallholder farmers in African nations to control sweet potato weevils.” The postdoctoral researcher will develop and refine laboratory sweet potato weevil feeding assays and identify and characterize microbial activity against the sweet potato weevil. Continue reading

Mississippi manages sweet potato weevil with pheromone trapping

In Delta Farm Press

Mississippi’s trapping program for the sweet potato weevil got under way mid-July, about a week later than normal due to rain-delayed planting, says James Dale, branch director of the Plant Pest and Pesticide Divisions of the Department of Agriculture and Commerce’s Bureau of Plant Industry.

The bureau conducts the pheromone trapping program for the pest to meet requirements for shipping Mississippi sweet potatoes to weevil-free states.

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NC officials set up pest survey to protect sweet potatoes

Why aren’t sweet potato weevils moving off of the Carolina coast to the plethora of sweet potato farms further inland? That’s what researchers from the NC Department of Agriculture want to find out.

Specialists found the weevil near Carolina Beach in the early 1980s, and since then it has stayed in the area and has not moved toward the state’s coastal plain, where most of the sweet potato fields lie. So researchers are setting out nearly 500 traps to track the weevil population and to see what the weevils are feeding on.

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