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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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University of Florida study helps farmers find best fields for sweet potatoes

Wireworms won’t dampen the spirits of Florida’s sweet potato growers, thanks to ongoing research by scientists at the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agriculture Sciences.

Wireworms took center stage in Florida after some major sweet potato growers converted fields previously dedicated to grain crops to the sweet potato crop. Some acreage was initiated by a farm that had actually relocated to Florida after leaving California because of prolonged drought, hopeful to take advantage of Florida’s warm weather, abundant water resources and sandy soil. Continue reading

NC officials set up pest survey to protect sweet potatoes

Why aren’t sweet potato weevils moving off of the Carolina coast to the plethora of sweet potato farms further inland? That’s what researchers from the NC Department of Agriculture want to find out.

Specialists found the weevil near Carolina Beach in the early 1980s, and since then it has stayed in the area and has not moved toward the state’s coastal plain, where most of the sweet potato fields lie. So researchers are setting out nearly 500 traps to track the weevil population and to see what the weevils are feeding on.

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Cover Crops and Conservation Tillage equal better sweet potato production

Incorporating winter cover crops in sweet potato production may save farmers input costs, as well as improve soil fertility, increase land use efficiency, and help control insects.

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Mississippi farmers face problems from feral hogs

Multiplication tables are mind-blowing when it comes to wild hogs: One sow and two six month old piglets have the capability in 20 years of becoming 220,000 crop-eating, land-destroying, water-contaminating, disease-spreading animals.

Apply that formula to the thousands of feral hogs now in the Mississippi landscape, and the potential numbers become downright scary, farmers say.

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Mississippi producers’ needs include more research on IPM

For more than half a century, producers in northeast Mississippi have met annually with Extension and research leaders to discuss ways to improve production and efficiency in the region.

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