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Cotton growers should be patient in treating for target spot

In Delta Farm Press

Conditions in west Tennessee are setting up as conducive for target spot infestations in cotton. Or maybe not.

Heather Kelly, Extension pathologist at the University of Tennessee Research and Extension Center in Jackson, says several factors need to coincide for target spot to pose a threat to cotton. Continue reading

Growers need to apply more integrated approaches toward insects and diseases in face of Bt resistance

In Delta Farm Press

by Brad Robb, Delta Farm Press

Mid-South cotton growers face several tough decisions for 2018 as they deal with hard-to-control diseases and the increasingly difficult problem of Bt-resistant worm pests.

Tucker Miller, president, Miller Entomological Service Inc., Drew, Ms., speaking Thursday at the National Conservation Systems Conferences in Memphis, Tn., said growers will need to look closely at varieties as well as other management options.  Continue reading

Identification and Management of Leaf Spots in Cotton

by Heather Kelly, University of Tennessee

This year I have gotten more questions about leaf spots in cotton than any other.  It hasn’t always been clear which leaf spot is present, but the following resources can help identify and understand management options of leaf spots in cotton.

This season in cotton bacterial blight is the leading leaf spot culprit, but as canopies have been closed in some fields for over 2 weeks and have had good moisture, target spot might start showing up more often as well as other leaf spots. Use the resources below to identify what leaf spots you’re seeing and what the best management options are:

Continue reading

Target Spot in Cotton – How to identify it and management options

by Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

As cotton gets closer to blooming, scouts should be on the lookout for target spot and defoliation starting in the lower canopy.

The warm, wet weather the Mid-South has been experiencing could promote target spot in cotton fields, especially those fields that saw the disease in 2016 and are irrigated. Additional factors that increase target spot risk include higher planting rates, excessive N rates, narrow row spacing, vigorous growth, as well as hot, humid weather. Some facts about target spot: Continue reading

Cotton farmers need to be wary of diseases like target spot and bacterial blight

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

In addition to root-knot nematodes and target spot disease, Georgia cotton farmers should be prepared to fight bacterial blight, said University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait.

Kemerait advises producers, specifically those who farm in fields with a history of bacterial blight, to consider planting resistant varieties and managing the residue from last year’s crop. Farmers could also rotate the affected field away from cotton for at least one season. Continue reading

Spotting and managing target spot

To hear first-hand from an expert about how to manage target spot and some results of research to help, tune in next Monday afternoon at 3 PM for Dr. Austin Hagan’s webinar on target spot. Click here to register.

From an article by Tyson Raper, University of Tennessee, in Cotton Grower

As the cotton specialist for the state of Tennessee, I am constantly on the lookout for potential issues that may impact Mid-South cotton production. Over the past several years, I have occasionally observed several “target spots,” or Corynespora leaf spots, on the lower leaves of rank cotton plants. Although the number of spots and number of affected leaves are typically low, many growers have asked if the disease might be able to cause the 200-400/lb lint per acre yield penalties reported along the Gulf coast. Continue reading

Tune in February 27 to learn how to manage target spot

In a webinar on Monday, February 27, at 3 PM Eastern, Austin Hagan, professor and extension plant pathologist at Auburn University, will discuss ways to recognize target spot in your field as well as management techniques to lower the risk.

Target spot, which is caused by the fungus Corynespora cassiicola, is an emerging disease in cotton in the Lower and Mid-South in the U.S. Phylogenetically, C. cassiicola isolates collected from cotton across the Lower South are distinct from those collected from other crops, particularly vegetables. This suggests that C. cassiicola isolates from cotton are either a recent introduction to the U.S. or has arisen from a mutation. Rainfall patterns along with variety selection and management inputs relating to yield potential influence the target spot risk in cotton. Greatest target spot-attributed defoliation and subsequent yield losses, which may exceed 300 pounds of lint per acre, have been recorded for an intensively managed, susceptible variety having a yield potential above 2.5 to 3 bales per acre. Continue reading