New Texas A&M AgriLife facility trains pest control pros

by Gabe Saldana, Texas A&M AgriLife

A new training facility for pest management professionals has opened its doors at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Dallas, where entomologists converted a graduate student dormitory into what they now call “ground zero for pest control training in Texas.”

The facility is called IPM Experience House after the science-based approach to pest control known as integrated pest management. Continue reading

Wondering what has been going on with your juniper and cypress trees?

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s been a tough 2017 so far for juniper and cypress varieties used in landscapes, as pests and diseases make the rounds, causing blight and tree die-offs.

Kevin Ong, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist and director of the Texas Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in College Station, said there are several different possible disease or pest issues plaguing juniper and cypress varieties around the state, from the Gulf Coast to Central, North and East Texas. Continue reading

Manage pigweed early for best results

In Southwest Farm Press

by Muthu Bagavathiannan, Josh McGinty, Vijay Singh, Peter Dotray , Texas A&M AgriLife

Palmer amaranth and waterhemp are two pigweed species that have become problematic in row crop production fields in Texas. Palmer amaranth is widespread in the High Plains, Rio Grande Valley, Coastal Bend and Central Texas regions, whereas waterhemp is predominantly found in the Upper Gulf Coast as well as the Blacklands regions.

Herbicide resistance in these two species is an emerging issue and Extension specialists have emphasized the need for diversifying weed management tactics to prevent or delay resistance. Because pigweeds produce enormous amounts of seeds, preventing seed production from the escapes is a critical component of sustainable resistance management. Research has shown that a single Palmer pigweed plant can produce in excess of 1.5 million seeds under good growing conditions. Continue reading

Wild pig management workshop set for April 26 in Lampasas, TX

Texas A&M AgriLife will conduct a Wild Pig Management workshop for area landowners and the public April 26 in Lampasas.

The workshop will be held from 8:30 a.m. – 2:15 p.m. at the Grace Fellowship Church, 2974 S. U.S. Highway 281. It is is a joint effort among Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, the Lampasas River Watershed Partnership and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board. Continue reading

Program educates youth on the importance of pollinators to agriculture, daily life

by Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

St. John Berchmans Catholic School students in San Antonio learned about the importance of pollinators at the Feed a Bee Planting Event presented Feb. 27 by Bayer in collaboration with National 4-H and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Bexar County.

The event kicked off Bayer’s 12th annual AgVocacy Forum, which this year takes place from Feb. 28 through March 1 in San Antonio. Continue reading

Spider mite control in corn aided by moisture

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has a list of do’s and don’ts when it comes to spider mite treatment on corn, according to Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist in Amarillo.

Spider mite damage can reduce corn silage yields about 17 percent and grain yield production by 23 percent or more when not controlled, Bynum said, speaking recently at the High Plains Irrigation Conference in Amarillo. Continue reading

The best window of time to trap wild pigs is about to close

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Wild pigs are most vulnerable to trapping before food and forages become more available in the spring, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Dr. Billy Higginbotham, AgriLife Extension wildlife specialist, Overton, said most acorns have either been consumed or are rotting on the ground now, and wild pigs are searching for alternative food sources. Continue reading