Sugarcane aphid research outlines economical control methods

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Sorghum producers can reduce input costs and improve their bottom line in the battle against sugarcane aphids in the Texas High Plains through the use of selected varieties and early planting and scouting, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study.

Dr. Ada (ah da) Szczepaniec (Stra PA netz), AgriLife Research entomologist in Amarillo, has wrapped up her first year of assessing the impact of planting dates, insecticide seed treatments and resistant varieties of sorghum on the timing and severity of sugarcane aphid infestations in a study near Bushland. Continue reading

Cotton variety trial results reflect season’s ups, downs in East, South Texas

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

The 2016 Replicated Agronomic Cotton Evaluation or RACE trial results from South and East Texas are in and reflect the extremes of the past season, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

“We had many regions with superb yield and quality, while other regions suffered tremendously from excessive late-season rainfall,” said Dr. Gaylon Morgan, AgriLife Extension state cotton specialist in College Station. Continue reading

Flag the Technology helps farmers identify herbicide sensitive fields

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the Texas Plant Protection Association have collaborated on a Flag the Technology program that identifies crop fields sensitive to certain herbicides.

With two new herbicide resistance technologies which will be widely used in cotton, corn and soybeans, program coordinators say it is critical farmers know which fields are safe for application of the new products and which are sensitive to them. Continue reading

Feral Hog Management Workshop set for Jan. 30 in La Vernia, TX

by: Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

A Feral Hog Management Workshop will be held Jan. 30 at the La Vernia Chamber of Commerce, 12301 U.S. Highway 87 in La Vernia.

There is no cost for the program, which will be from 8:30 a.m.-3:15 p.m. with registration from 8-8:30 a.m. Continue reading

Use all tools available for weed control

In Southwest Farm Press

by Ron Smith

Herbicide-resistant weeds are no longer a problem that could cause trouble for Texas farmers sometime in the future — rather, “Weed resistance is real and a problem across Texas, the country, and the world,” says Pete Dotray, professor of weed science at Texas Tech University and a Texas AgriLife Extension specialist.

Pest resistance, including resistant weeds, isn’t new Dotray said at a recent Ag Technology Conference on the Texas A&M-Commerce campus. More than a hundred years ago — in 1908 –resistance to an insecticide was first noted; fungicide resistance was identified in 1940; and weed resistance to herbicides was confirmed in 1957, when spreading dayflower was identified as resistant to 2, 4-D. Continue reading

Pasture management program to be held in Texas

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will hold an East Texas Pasture Management Program Feb. 17 in Overton.

The program begins with registration at 12:30 p.m. at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, 1710 N. Farm-to-Market Road 3053.

Cost is $25 per person if preregistered by Feb. 15 or $35 the day of the event. Register online at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu or call AgriLife Extension Conference Services at 979-845-2604. Continue reading

Texas A&M garners $10 million grant to establish center, fight vector-borne diseases

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

Texas A&M AgriLife recently received a substantial monetary boost to bolster its aggressive fight to stem the spread of vector-borne diseases for the public good, said Dr. David Ragsdale, Texas A&M University entomology department head at College Station.

Ragsdale said the $10 million five-year grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be used to establish the Western Gulf Coast Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Diseases. Continue reading