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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Scouting for insects is still important in a home vegetable garden

By Becky Griffin, University of Georgia

Whether you work on a large family farm, in a home vegetable garden, or in a small, community garden vegetable plot, routinely scouting for insects should be an important part of your vegetable-growing plan.

Insect pests can be a costly problem in vegetables. The life cycles of some insect pests are so short that missing just one week of scouting can lead to an increase in pests and damaged crops. Continue reading

Sugarcane aphid populations increasing rapidly in the High Plains

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Sugarcane aphid populations are exploding in grain sorghum fields across the Texas High Plains, warns a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist in Amarillo.

Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist, said the sugarcane aphid populations in the South Plains have reached economic thresholds. Infestations in the field can be just a few aphids per plant to a thousand or more aphids per plant. Continue reading

Peanut pests are out – here’s how to manage them

In Southeast Farm Press

by Andrew Sawyer, University of Georgia Extension – Thomas County

July is when the most serious insect problems in peanuts show up. We need to watch for threecornered alfalfa hoppers, foliage feeding caterpillars, lesser cornstalk borers, two spotted spider mites, and potato leaf hoppers and anything else that may hang out in a peanut field. Continue reading

AgriLife Extension experts: Time for pecan growers to scout, treat for casebearer

By: Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

Now is the time for pecan growers to look for and possibly spray to kill an insect pest that poses a threat to their crop, said Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts.

“One of the most destructive infesting insects of nut-bearing trees is the pecan nut casebearer,” said Dr. Larry Stein, an AgriLife Extension horticulturist based in Uvalde. “Casebearer larvae tunnel into nutlets and frequently destroy all the nutlets in a cluster.” Continue reading

When to treat wheat for armyworms

in Delta Farm Press

by Gus Lorenz, Arkansas Extension Entomologist

There have been sporadic reports of true armyworm feeding in Arkansas wheat this past week. The question is: “Are they really causing any damage?”

The armyworm population is very early this year and we continue to receive reports of armyworms in wheat that is flowering to early grain fill. Continue reading

Should NC soybean growers spray for stink bugs?

In Southeast Farm Press

by Dominic Reisig, NC State University

Right now we are witnessing typical end-of-season insect patterns.  Multigenerational bean leaf beetle populations densities are at their highest now and soybeans with developing seed are stink bug magnets.

Continue reading

Flathead borers attacking blueberry bushes in Georgia

In Southeast Farm Press

By Ash Sial, University of Georgia

Over the past few weeks, we have received several reports of flatheaded borer infestation in blueberry orchards. The flatheaded borers are a complex of over 600 species of beetles in the United States. The adult flatheaded borers are metallic wood-boring beetles, which are perhaps the most serious pests attacking a wide range of bush and tree species.

Continue reading